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  • Judi Lynn (3209 posts)
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    12.29 Remember the Massacre at Wounded Knee

    12.29

    Remember the Massacre at Wounded Knee

    Peter Cole

    On this day in 1890, the US Army murdered as many as 300 Native American men, women, and children.
    As dawn appeared on December 29, 1890, about 350 Lakota Indians awoke, having been forced by the US Army to camp the night before alongside the Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. The US Cavalry’s 7th Regiment had “escorted” them there the day prior and, now, surrounded the Indians with the intent to arrest Chief Big Foot (also called Spotted Elk) and disarm the warriors.

    When a disagreement erupted, army soldiers opened fire, including with Hotchkiss machine guns. Within minutes, hundreds of children, men, and women were shot down. Perhaps as many as three hundred killed and scores wounded that morning.

    Few Americans now know that the deadliest shootings in US history were massacres of native peoples. Today is the anniversary of the largest such massacre.

    The event’s common name, “The Battle of Wounded Knee,” obscures the true horrors of that day. For this was no “battle” — it was a massacre.

     

    Lynetta, pinduck, 7wo7rees and 7 othershistorylovr, bbgrunt, Downwinder, Haikugal, jwirr, polly7, HeartoftheMidwest like this

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  • pinduck (204 posts)
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    1. Thanks for this important post. The facts you present need to be taught to

    public school students, beginning in elementary school.

    “We honor your service” – indeed not.

    • Judi Lynn (3209 posts)
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      2. Looks as if they hope we'll all die before we can learn the truth!

      • pinduck (204 posts)
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        3. Facts, even when backed up by photos, are to be ignored if they conflict with

        the limits to speech the ruling circles condone. Smedley Butler is a non-person as far as the establishment is concerned.

        The Clinton emails emails that have been made public show that paid staffers routinely referred to FDR-type democrats and those concerned about the precarious state of the earth’s biosphere as “the red army.”

        Maybe we won’t have to die if we’re kept invisible.

        • Judi Lynn (3209 posts)
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          4. Smedley Butler tried to serve the country, not the oligarchs,

          and then committed the sin of not cooperating them when they asked for his assistance in assassinating FDR.

          It’s grotesque to realize very, very few US Americans have any idea whatsoever who he was,  but a piece of trash like Oliver North became nearly a household name during Reagan’s bloody (for all of Central America) rule. They aren’t even aware of what was done to the human race by their idiot ideologue, and if they were, they wouldn’t care, anyway.

          Being a human with a conscience is an affliction for anyone trying to do really well in the US.

          • pinduck (204 posts)
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            5. That's a good way to put it: Conscience as handicap. It is a handicap in the

            military; Wall St; intelligence agencies; petro & mineral extraction.

            At least Butler’s short book is still available and affordable since it’s out of copyright. It should be taught in our public schools.