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Dinner Table

  • Deadpool (4763 posts)
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    Dinner Table

    If you are at a dinner table with some other people and they asked you to join hands and pray with them, what would you do?

    Haikugal, Marym625 like this

    "I grew up with six brothers. That's how I learned to dance - waiting to get into the bathroom." -Bob Hope

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11 replies
  • draa (690 posts)
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    1. I would join hands.

    But I wouldn’t bow my head (which I never understood anyway).

    I have holiday dinners with my family and we usually hold hands while my granddaughter says prayer. I do it out if respect for the people at the table.

    • Enlightenment (623 posts)
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      7. Depending on the situation, I might join hands

      but I will never bow my head, close my eyes, or otherwise pretend to pray. Not my gig – and besides, if all the religious people are doing the head bowing and eye closing thing, they aren’t looking at me not doing it. No harm, no foul.

  • Marym625 (12064 posts)
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    2. Depends on the situation

    If with good friends, well that would never happen

    At someone’s house, I would join hands but not pray. Assuming it was the home owner who requested it.

    If out with friends and new people I would politely decline

    821484_1
    • Haikugal (3674 posts)
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      4. That's what I've done in the past…

      I had issues with evangelical inlaws and refused to bow my head or close my eyes when they insisted on performing (and it was a performance) their prayers in public places. They were very in my face at all times and it didn’t end well.

      :devil:

           
      • Marym625 (12064 posts)
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        5. I'm sorry it didn't end well

        I really hate people trying to insist that others do and believe as they do. Especially when it comes to religion.

        Good for you for resisting.

        821484_1
  • FanBoy (4638 posts)
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    3. I'd join hands close my eyes and do whatever i pleased in my head.

    I don’t consider it a big issue; I consider keeping friendships more important than most things in life.

    OTOH, if someone tells me their god hates specific types of people (or any people. actually), I’ll take issue with that.  But praying per se?  No, I don’t see the crime.

  • HIP56948 (1210 posts)
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    6. I've been in that situation a few times. I took their hands, bowed my head but..

    …(of course) didn’t pray. That stuff doesn’t bother me. I wouldn’t be eating with them if they were offensive to me.

  • Deadpool (4763 posts)
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    8. All good answers so far…

    As for me, it depends. If i’m hosting, there is no group prayer. If someone wants to pray silently to themselves, I won’t fuss. If a friend is hosting, i’ll hold hands but that’s it.

    :)

    "I grew up with six brothers. That's how I learned to dance - waiting to get into the bathroom." -Bob Hope

  • Trouble (3022 posts)
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    9. I don't, I go to the sink and wash my hands

    I get mean when it comes to religion and when they try to guilt me into playing their game.  Nothing else gets under my skin like religion.

    Do your own damned research and be sure to include extraordinary proof so others don't need to think.      
  • mr blur (33 posts)
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    10. Say "No, thank you."

    and thank the person who made the meal.

    Always works.

    Reality is not a democracy
  • LWolf (76 posts)
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    11. I would join hands

    and use the moment to appreciate being at the dinner table with other people, with sharing a meal and time for them in my head and heart.

    I don’t mind respecting their ritual, and the intent behind it.