Abortion Bounty Hunters in Texas Are Vigilantes Not ‘Whistleblowers’

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    • #444611
      ZimInSeattle
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      • Total Posts: 2,245

       

      One of the many preposterous claims coming from supporters of the vicious new Texas law against abortion is that bounty hunters — standing to gain a $10,000 reward from the state — will somehow be “whistleblowers.” The largest anti-abortion group in Texas is trying to attach the virtuous “whistleblower” label to predators who’ll file lawsuits against abortion providers and anyone who “aids or abets” a woman getting an abortion.

      As a journalist and activist, I’ve worked with a range of genuine whistleblowers during the last several decades. Coming from diverse backgrounds, they ended up tangling with institutions ranging from the Pentagon and CIA to the National Security Agency and the Veterans Administration. Their personalities and outlooks varied greatly, but none of them were bullies. None of them wanted to threaten or harm powerless people in distress. On the contrary, the point of the whistleblowing was to hold powerful institutions accountable for violations of human rights.

      What the Texas vigilantes will be seeking to do is quite the opposite. The targets will be women who want abortions as well as their allies — people under duress — with pursuers seeing a bullseye on their backs.

      The whistleblowers I’ve known have all taken huge risks. Most lost their jobs. Many endured all-out prosecutions on bogus charges, like violating the Espionage Act for the “crime” of informing the public with vital information. Some went to prison. Almost all suffered large — often massive — losses that wrecked their personal finances.

      More: https://www.counterpunch.org/2021/09/08/abortion-bounty-hunters-in-texas-are-vigilantes-not-whistleblowers/

      "Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime" - Aristotle "The more I see of the moneyed peoples, the more I understand the guillotine" - George Bernard Shaw "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, will make violent revolution inevitable" - JFK "If wars can be started by lies, they can be stopped by truth." ~ Julian Assange #SurviveAndRevolt

    • #444616
      retired liberal
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 4,363

      to her husband, when she became her husband’s property. There was no ceremony, or written contract involved.
      At one time women were though of not much more than cattle, sheep, goats and chickens. Women couldn’t own property, or run a business. If they ran out of male family members to own them. they were in big trouble.
      Their only choices were to become prostitutes, to get money for food and shelter, or sell themselves into slavery. neither were good prospects.
      As late as the 1950’s wives needed her husbands written permission to secure a bank loan. Women today still have a long way to go to have equal Rights as white males.
      Texas legislators today, still think of women, the same way as men did of women some 3000 years ago.
      Most conservative legislators are as educated as humanity was 3000 years ago, despite having collage and university degrees.

      We are an arrogant species, believing our fantasy based "facts" are better than the other person's fake facts.
      The older we get, the less "Life in Prison" is a deterrent.
      Always wear a proper mask when out and about. The life you save could be both yours and mine.
      Don't forget that the S in IoT stands for Security.

      • #444691
        Bernie Boomer
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        • Total Posts: 556

        3000 years ago – in most societies – than they did once Christianity got its hooks in. Which isn’t to say there was equality, at all, but quite a few ancient cultures allowed women considerable autonomy under the law.
        Ancient Greek culture sucked for women (except for the interesting and accepted practice of birth control/abortion using silphium) but look across the isthmus to Sparta and it looked very different. Women in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt also had more rights – the right to conduct business/hold property/divorce – than women would have once ‘the gospel’ started spreading.
        But you’re right that it’s not just religion that drives the desire to control women; it’s power – real, perceived, and desired.
        One of my favorite eye-rolling US history moments is New Jersey. Their 1776 constitution gave all property-holding adults the right to vote (technically, that excluded many but not all women, along with many men, but it didn’t specifically disenfranchise either gender) – and further voting rights laws passed in the 1790s specifically said “he or she.” But women were voting and that got some men’s panties in a twist, so they changed the laws and modified the constitution in 1807, taking care of that brief moment in political equality for another 100-plus years.

        We seem to be going backward at this point. 🙁

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