An Energy Crisis Is Gripping the World, with Potentially Grave Consequences

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    • #449026
      RCW2020
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      • Total Posts: 696

      Will Englund  <time datetime=”2021-10-09T10:00:02.000Z” data-always-show=”true”>8 hrs ago</time>

      Energy is so hard to come by right now that some provinces in China are rationing electricity, Europeans are paying sky-high prices for liquefied natural gas, power plants in India are on the verge of running out of coal, and the average price of a gallon of regular gasoline in the United States stood at $3.25 on Friday — up from $1.72 in April.

      As the global economy recovers and global leaders prepare to gather for a landmark conference on climate change, the sudden energy crunch hitting the world is threatening already stressed supply chains, stirring geopolitical tensions and raising questions about whether the world is ready for the green energy revolution when it’s having trouble powering itself right now.

      The economic recovery from the pandemic recession lies behind the crisis, coming after a year of retrenchment in coal, oil and gas extraction. Other factors include an unusually cold winter in Europe that drained reserves, a series of hurricanes that forced shutdowns of Gulf oil refineries, a turn for the worse in relations between China and Australia that led Beijing to stop importing coal from Down Under, and a protracted calm spell over the North Sea that has sharply curtailed the output of electricity-generating wind turbines.

      “It radiates from one energy market to another,” said Daniel Yergin, author of “The New Map: Energy, Climate, and the Clash of Nations.”

      “Governments are scrambling to get subsidies in place to avoid a tremendous political backlash,” Yergin said. “There’s a pervasive anxiety about what may or may not happen this winter, because of something we have no control over, which is the weather.”

      Link to source…

    • #449027
      ArtfromArk
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      China quit buying anthracite coal from Australia because China felt “slighted” by something some Australian said, so they quit buying Australian anthracite, even anthracite that was already in Chinese ports. India said that it would by that anthracite, no problem. As a result, China started scrambling to buy lower-grade coal from Mongolia and Russia, but it’s not enough to make up for loss of the Australian coal.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #449044
      jbnw
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    • #449100
      jbnw
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      • Total Posts: 5,740

      Posted by The Duran a couple of days ago.

    • #449131
      Scott Crowder
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      • Total Posts: 622

      They’re just manufactiring consent to ignore climate change and continue business as usual.

      The money quote is right here:

      “As the global economy recovers and global leaders prepare to gather for a landmark conference on climate change, the sudden energy crunch hitting the world is threatening already stressed supply chains, stirring geopolitical tensions and raising questions about whether the world is ready for the green energy revolution when it’s having trouble powering itself right now”

    • #449536
      Paul H Mentzer
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      • Total Posts: 10

      anthracite is the cleanest and most energy form of coal. You need to adjust any Furnace designed to burn anthracite to burn other types of coal.  And this is not a small difference, you are looking at half to a quarter energy in these other form of coal.  Thus you have to burn two to three the coal to produce the same amount of energy.

      Just a comment on anthracite coal and the sources of such coal is limited and replacing anthracite with “Inferior” coal means burning more coal, producing more pollution to get the use of the same amount of energy.

      anthracite, also called “Hard coal” in the US is the coal in Eastern Pennsylvania.  I live in Western Pennsylvania and we mine Bituminous coal which has half the energy per ton of coal then anthracite coal.

      Most “Western coal”, mined in the Western US, is even dirter and even less energy per ton Lignite coal.  The US has been shifting from Bituminous coal to Lignite ever since Reagan. Thus US coal production per BTU (British thermal units) peaked about 1997, even as coal tonnage mined has increased since 1997 as Bituminous coal was replaced by Lignite (anthracite coal production pre WWII and no a large factor in US coal production).

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