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  • Jefferson23 (3136 posts)
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    Baltimore Whistleblower Teacher Part II: 'I Could Lose my Job for Standing up

    2/7/2017

    Baltimore Whistleblower Teacher Part II: ‘I Could Lose my Job for Standing up for These Kids’

    In the second part of our exclusive interview, a Baltimore teacher says one of the biggest obstacles to reform is threats to employees who tell the truth about the chaotic conditions inside city schools

    WHISTLEBLOWER: And you’re telling me that I could lose my job if I stand up for these kids, which is one of the reasons I get surplus, because I say something, and then I become a problem.

     

    TAYA GRAHAM: This is Taya Graham, reporting for The Real News Network in Baltimore City, Maryland.

     

    As we previously reported, the Baltimore City School System is facing a $129 million deficit, and the prospect of laying off nearly 1,000 school employees. But amid the fiscal pain The Real News has gone behind the scenes, to find out what’s really happening inside a school system that many say fails both students, and the community.

    To do this, we have conducted an in-depth interview with a whistleblower teacher, who has come forward to give us an unvarnished view of what’s going on inside city schools. In part one, he talked about school conditions, student discipline, and the lack of support from administrators. In this segment he talks about politics, perception, and some of the external forces that set up schools to fail.

    But first, I’m joined by investigative reporter, Stephen Janis — to give us some background on what’s going on, and the implications of what the whistle-blower teacher had to say. Stephen, can you give us some background?

    http://therealnews.com/t2/story:18313:Baltimore-Whistleblower-Teacher-Part-II%3A-%27I-Could-Lose-my-Job-for-Standing-up-for-These-Kids%27

     

    Smarmie Doofus, Two way street, Haikugal and 1 otherDamnYankeeInHouston like this

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  • FanBoy (7181 posts)
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    1. From the comments:

    Criminality, like decency, creates a lot more of itself in several feedback loops until it dominates all discourse and the lives of everyone involved. Quasi-criminal elected representatives collude with quasi-criminal corporate executives; bond traders collude with bankers with rating agencies with real estate developers with private prisons with security firms, etc. Quasi-criminality pervades the system at every level and what little money gets to education is turned into foam for the runway instead of bricks for the foundation.

    The result? Children are denied the one self-actualizing option a poor person can choose: education. Our society takes away everything from the children of Baltimore (and other cities) and lies in wait to prosecute, penalize, and imprison the very same children the state and city abused in school and at home through greed-generated poverty, mismanagement and crime.

    If teachers are being assaulted as frequently as this one says they are, imagine how these children are behaving outside of school. If some of them are “stomping” their peers’ heads to the point of hospitalization, imagine what they do in the dark of a dumpster shadow. And all the initiatives in the world, all the good intentions or bake sales or rallies, are not going to fix any of this. It’s not only about reforming education or the prison system or law enforcement.

    The fundamental driving force for everything bad here is very simply criminals who retain the highest levels of power and wealth throughout our society. They are all the colluding profiteers mentioned earlier. They are the source of nearly all our ills. They are ruining hundreds of thousands of children every year for profit. Until we directly address the extraordinarily anti-social behavior of our most powerful and wealthy, we’re never going to make a dent in the behavior of our poorest children or their parents.

    https://lisa.gerda-henkel-stiftung.de/austerity

    • Jefferson23 (3136 posts)
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      2. +1.

      And what our revolution is about: *Until we directly address the extraordinarily anti-social behavior of our most powerful and wealthy, we’re never going to make a dent in the behavior of our poorest children or their parents.