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Home Topics in Depth Science And Environment Changing climate threatens New Mexico's pinon trees

  • Judi Lynn (4083 posts)
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    Changing climate threatens New Mexico's pinon trees

    Changing climate threatens New Mexico’s pinon trees

    KOAT | Updated: 1:40 PM MDT Mar 20, 2017

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) —
    Scientists say New Mexico’s official state tree is threatened by the region’s warming and drying climate.

     

     

    RadicleFantast, 7wo7rees, twenty like this

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  • pinduck (1109 posts)
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    1. Pinyon pine seeds are edible and taste good although most say they

    come in second to the European pine nuts.

    There are large stretches of the southwest that are dominated by two tree species: Pinyon pines and Utah juniper. Neither grow much taller than 30 feet but they are hardy and in some places grow in dense stands and in other drier places, are spread thinly.

    Pinyon pines can live to 800 years in locations that favor longevity.

    "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
    • hopemountain (1178 posts)
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      2. pinyon seeds were/are considered

      good remedy to foster fertility by several indigenous groups along both sides of the sierra nevadas of california.

      "economic and environmental justice is spiritual work." ~ tom b. k. goldtooth .... "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world; a world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations; a world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again.  In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things, and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be as one."  ~ Crazy Horse ~ Oglala Lakota (circa 1840-1877). His words of prophecy to Sitting Bull while sharing a sacred pipe a few short days before his death.
      • pinduck (1109 posts)
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        3. Navajo people spread blankets under a Pinyon tree and give the tree a

        good shaking and the seeds fall down on to the blankets and are easily gathered.

        "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
        • hopemountain (1178 posts)
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          4. that is a cool trick-

          they have a sweet taste with a little bit of a piny resin ‘ping’ at the end. the fat content is very high.

          "economic and environmental justice is spiritual work." ~ tom b. k. goldtooth .... "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world; a world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations; a world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again.  In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things, and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be as one."  ~ Crazy Horse ~ Oglala Lakota (circa 1840-1877). His words of prophecy to Sitting Bull while sharing a sacred pipe a few short days before his death.
          • pinduck (1109 posts)
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            5. I've helped gather them and eaten my share. I think it's the "resin ping" that

            puts some people off and gives them the opinion the European pine nut is better. I like both but I prefer Pinyon nuts.

            Didn’t know about the high fat content but many seeds that ripen and are spread by birds – Clarks Nutcrakers do a good job of breaking open the cones and scattering the ones they don’t eat – have a high fat content. In the east, dogwood seeds are both red, attractive to birds, and high fat for concentrated fuel for migrating birds.

            "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
            • hopemountain (1178 posts)
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              6. ha! i had no idea about the dogwoods

              there are many – just beginning to flower in my neck of the woods. beautiful, trees.

              i’m partial to the pinyons off the 395 south of bishop along the eastern slopes of the sierras – just south of the monache meadows.

              "economic and environmental justice is spiritual work." ~ tom b. k. goldtooth .... "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world; a world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations; a world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again.  In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things, and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be as one."  ~ Crazy Horse ~ Oglala Lakota (circa 1840-1877). His words of prophecy to Sitting Bull while sharing a sacred pipe a few short days before his death.
              • pinduck (1109 posts)
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                8. I am familiar with Bishop. You can take one of two trails, one leaves from Lone

                Pine I think, up to Mt Whitney. If you go east, you get into the White Mountains with the ancient Bristlecone Pines and the easy walk-up to 14,000 foot White mountain Peak. There are great views into the Owens Valley 10,000 feet below and then northeast to the sand dune area in the Great Basin.  If you take the road to the Tuolumne (sp?) entrance to Yosemite and kike up to the summit of Mt. Dana, you get to see all of Mono Lake beyond Mono Plateau. The view of Mono Lake from 13,000 feet is a grand sight.

                Years ago the Utes chained down hundreds of acres of Pinyons so they could graze cattle. I could watch it from 8000 feet looking south and thought it was terrible. Then they burned it all, polluting the air. The next year they got mostly dust devils and not grazing.

                I wonder if your Pinyons along 395 are the same species as the ones in eastern UT and  SW CO – I guess they would be? Nice trees anyway and seem to adapt to a variety of conditions.

                "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
                • hopemountain (1178 posts)
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                  9. yes! yes! yes! – i hiked that 17 mile trail

                  through the bristlecone to a forest service cabin with horses in a meadow many years ago. the bristlecone are sacred beings to me. i was just remembering them the other day.

                  love the high desert and the view of the basin from the high peaks. fished, backpacked and worked both sides of the sierras east of yosemite and south to the kern, mostly.

                  lol – serendipity. lived in durango and backpacked across the 4 corners from medicine hat to rainbow bridge on the navajo and hopi reservations. had special permission and had to have a guide for a botany/biology semester out of ft lewis college.

                  not sure whether the pinyons in sw colorado / so utah are exactly the same as the ones in the eastern sierras. the ones west of ridgecrest and up to bishop are a bit taller than the ones in further east.

                  in the early 70’s i worked in the sequoia-inyo  on a couple of crews building the PCT from olancha peak (above lone pine) down across monache, to kennedy meadows along the south fork of the kern and south across the highway from lake isabella to the 395.

                  thanks for the trip back in time, pinduck.

                  "economic and environmental justice is spiritual work." ~ tom b. k. goldtooth .... "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world; a world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations; a world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again.  In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things, and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be as one."  ~ Crazy Horse ~ Oglala Lakota (circa 1840-1877). His words of prophecy to Sitting Bull while sharing a sacred pipe a few short days before his death.
                  • pinduck (1109 posts)
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                    10. Wow! Our daughter was born in Cortez and I am familiar with Durango and

                    the Million Dollar Hwy up to Silverton & Ouray. Also the three 14ers east of the D&RG railroad tracks in the national forest.

                    I went with friends from Gouldings to Rainbow Bridge and back and it was a super trip.

                    The ancient Bristlecones are a treasure – botanically, nationally, and personally. Seeing these trees, some with only a strip of xylem and phloem alive but with the dead wood still not rotting in the dryness and altitude is something to remember. Then there are the young trees with full crowns. I learned there that trees on the same hill top may be 1000 or more years older than the ones on the other side of the hill. The ones on the driest side, and most exposed, live longer because the disease agents can’t survive there like they can a few hundred yards away but in a damper – but certainly not damp – location. I think the easternmost Bristlecones are in Cedar Breaks Natl Monument in SW Utah all above 10,000 feet. There are also Bristlecones in Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada below the summit of Wheeler Peak. Wheeler Peak is over 13,000 feet and is a not-too-hard walkup. The summit used to house a station on the army’s heliograph network. Soldiers would be stationed on numerous high peaks and on sunny days could relay  messages across large parts of the country very quickly – this before telegraph lines were strung.

                    Mono pass separates the Inyo and Sequoia Natl Forests I think. Mt Starr is to the right as you hike from Mammoth Lakes and a 12,000 foot peak is to you left. Good views from that one. There is a permanent small body of water at the pass that’s fed from snowmelt from Starr. I friend of mine who does snow surveys  for the CA water authority told me that just a few years ago the magma under Mammoth was very active & geologists considered recommending an evacuation. The last two years, the activity has subsided but it’s thought that the area will blow one of these years.

                    Seems like we’ve been to many of the same places – places that not too many other people have been.

                    Regards!

                    "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
                    • hopemountain (1178 posts)
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                      11. makes sense how aridity

                      has a major role in the bristlecone trees’ adaptation over the centuries. i understand there is a bristlecone in the white mountains >5,600 years of age (location secret). i thought they only survived to the krumholtz – but 13k is amazing to hear. much more to ponder about these ancient beings.

                      ha – funny how we have connections to such unique places. makes me smile.

                      "economic and environmental justice is spiritual work." ~ tom b. k. goldtooth .... "Upon suffering beyond suffering: the Red Nation shall rise again and it shall be a blessing for a sick world; a world filled with broken promises, selfishness and separations; a world longing for light again. I see a time of Seven Generations when all the colors of mankind will gather under the Sacred Tree of Life and the whole Earth will become one circle again.  In that day, there will be those among the Lakota who will carry knowledge and understanding of unity among all living things, and the young white ones will come to those of my people and ask for this wisdom. I salute the light within your eyes where the whole Universe dwells. For when you are at that center within you and I am that place within me, we shall be as one."  ~ Crazy Horse ~ Oglala Lakota (circa 1840-1877). His words of prophecy to Sitting Bull while sharing a sacred pipe a few short days before his death.
                    • pinduck (1109 posts)
                      Profile photo of pinduck Donor

                      12. Makes me smile too – glad we got to converse. 5600 years Wow! I hope that tree's

                      location is forever kept a secret.

                      If I gave the impression that Bristlecone pines live up to 13,000 feet in Great Basin NP, I am sorry. The pines live in the basin well below the peak well within the krumholtz zone. There’s a permanent snowfield down there -looking down from the peak – and the pines form a semicircle around it and the pond it makes.

                      The Bristlecones at Cedar Breaks are all above 10,000 feet but timberline there is 10,600 feet.

                      In Newfoundland, where timberline is 2000 feet, krumholtz is called tuckamore.

                      "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
  • so far from heaven (7381 posts)
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    Bite me Deadpool.     "When you're in jail, a good friend will be trying to bail you out. A best friend will be in the cell next to you saying, 'Damn, that was fun.'" -Groucho Marx