FBI Spying on dissent – especially leftwing dissent

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    • #210173
      Voltairine
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      • Total Posts: 1,796
    • #210194
      Mick063
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      • Total Posts: 571

      Carl Sagan once proclaimed that it would take multiple lifetimes to read every book in the Library of Congress. So for Sagan, the key wasn’t the impossible goal of reading all of the books, but in choosing the most important books to read.

      EVERYONE is being spied upon.

      There just isn’t enough eyes to meaningfully sift through the enormous, logarithmically growing mountain of data. The amount of data collected is greater than the Library of Congress. So for the alphabet agencies, it is about choosing what data to read, because they can’t possibly read it all.

      Think of it like the IRS. There is a ratio of basically one auditor per several hundred thousand tax returns. They cannot possibly catch every single tax cheat. Even with automated red flag warnings.

      So the alphabet agencies are “choosing which books to read” and those are apparently the books of left dissent. Perhaps more focus is placed there, but the power to control, to gain information for the use of political extortion, is much too tempting to limit such a focus to any one group or faction. For that reason, I would say that the focus would be on those that wield the most political influence and power…..of any political stripe. Who knows how many elected representatives, that are so dependent upon positive public perception for re-election, are making decisions based upon crippling information that has been gathered upon them.

      If there was dirt on Bernie or AOC, I’m positive it would have turned up by now. Certainly their spoken agenda shows no signs of hidden coercion. This is why ethics are so critically important in our political candidates. Unethical politicians are very easily manipulated.

       

      "I welcome their hatred" Franklin D Roosevelt

    • #210197
      Hobbit709
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      • Total Posts: 1,708

      This is news?

      The FBI has been spying since it’s inception.

      I don't waste my time teaching pigs to sing.

    • #210265
      Ohio Barbarian
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 13,830

      I recommend the movie J. Edgar(2011) to you. It’s produced and directed by Clint Eastwood, who is a great director in spite of being a right wing Republican. The movie is largely sympathetic to Hoover, but nonetheless points out his excesses, his flaws, and superbly describes how he gathered information on unethical politicians, like the Kennedys, in order to blackmail them.

      More importantly, it starts at the beginning, at the end of World War I and the beginning of the First Red Scare. It’s a pretty good history of the FBI up through the 1970s.

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      If Democrats don’t stand for the people, why should people stand for them?--Jim Hightower

    • #210271
      MizzGrizz
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      • Total Posts: 1,881

      Of course they are spying on dissent.They always have and they always will.

      Which is why it too should be broken up into a million pieces and scattered to the four winds.Though we possibly need a crime-solving agency in the manner of Scotland Yard,its charter and scope would need to be severely restricted.

      • #210410
        Earthartist
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        • Total Posts: 718

        I agree Mizz. But do not scatter them to the wind they are like bind weed they my spourt where ever they Land!!!!!

        Earthartist

      • #210638
        rampart
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        • Total Posts: 534

        they do a good job of keeping the fingerprint data base. I think they should keep a dna database.

        I think they are needed for interstate serial killers and bank robbers and such.

         

        • #210642
          djean111
          Participant
          • Total Posts: 3,933

          @rampart

          They already have a DNA database.  Ancestry shares its DNA records with the police/government.   Not sure about 23 and me.  But I notice you would have a real difficult time getting an anonymous DNA readout, because they intend for the police and insurance companies to use the databases.  IMO.   CMSU – people pay $99 to give their DNA to the government.  If the government told people to give them their DNA, people would be pissed.   Oh, and the ancestry findings are a bit off, too.  But yeah,the police asked ancestry to run some DNA and found the guy’s sister or something.  and GlaxoSmithKline bought a $300 million stake in 23andme.  But don’t worry.

    • #210328
      Mick063
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      • Total Posts: 571

       


      @Voltairine

      Self learning neural network AI… to read all we have written, and give four paragraph synopsis of the conclusions…

       

      Let’s apply this with quantifiable numbers. First we have to generate a sampling based upon volume and periodicity. I’ll start with a very modest sample ratio. Let’s assume that .5 percent of the population is being closely monitored at a periodicity of once per quarter (every three months).

      The U.S. adult population is approximately 210 million people. One half of one percent of that number is approximately one million, fifty thousand. I’ll round it to one million for ease of calculation. Multiply that times your fore mentioned four paragraphs of synopsis to bring a total of four million paragraphs to be read within a three month time frame.

      The average number of words in a paragraph is 200.  Four million paragraphs times 200 words equal 800 million words.

      The average reading speed is 200 words per minute.  Let’s give the professional readers the benefit of the doubt and assume they are trained to glean meaningful information at a rate of 150 words per minute. 800 million words divided by 150 words per minute gives us 5,333,333,33 minutes for a given professional reader to read them all, or reduced further, 88, 888.88 total hours to read them all. Assuming an eight hour work day, it would take an individual’s undivided attention, for eight straight hours per day, 666,667 days to read all the paragraphs.

      Given that we have a three month time frame to read all the paragraphs (approximately 90 days) until the next round of updated data must be read/interpreted, and assuming that these folks never take weekends off and read non stop for eight hours per day, it would take 7,407 individuals (666,667 divided by 90) to meaningfully interpret the collected data at a rate of once per quarter.

      Consider that there must be decisions made on who must be monitored and the workload increases to accommodate that decision making. Consider that when something meaningful is found, the reader/interpreter must stop and perform some type of reactionary measure, and the work load increases for that reactionary measure. Realistically, one would probably need to quadruple the number of people for effective surveillance. In other  words, the alphabet agencies would need about 30,000 people (an extremely conservative number) dedicated to nothing but data surveillance on a mere half percent of U.S. adult citizens, on a quarterly basis, using “self learning neural network AI… to read all we have written, and give four paragraph synopsis of the conclusions”.

      In the end, SOMEONE has to read SOMETHING.

      "I welcome their hatred" Franklin D Roosevelt

      • #210426
        Voltairine
        Participant
        • Total Posts: 1,796

        I had different train of thought, AI reading and contemplating the content of libraries – digitalized input – you mentioned, and concluding some output about meaning of life, universe and everything… based on semantic skills of google translator, or maybe someday something better 🙂

        You bring up interesting discussion. With blockchain tech evolution, desentralized data input and storage capacity has advanced in great leaps, and instead of top down surveillance we should think about how to use this for our benefit, how to make math good servant instead of bad master. First requirement should be voluntary sharing of data with an AI. With its superior large data prosessing power AI could e.g. suggest holistic and realistic policy alternatives to people to evaluate and backfeed to AI, until a consensus would be reached. AI wins human players already in Go, it’s not such a big step to start to utilize AI game mastery to social win-win games. But as said, to avoid authoritarian dystopias and Skynet scenarios, our cooperation with AI contributions to social intelligence must be based on freedom of association and voluntary participation.

        Aloha!

        • #210643
          Cold Mountain Trail
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          • Total Posts: 8,511

          In a 2014 study, Karl J. O’Dwyer and David Malone showed that the consumption of the bitcoin network was likely to be approximately equivalent to the electricity consumption of a country like Ireland, i.e. an estimated 3 GW.

          Imagine the consequences if this type of bitcoin currency becomes widespread. The global money supply in circulation is estimated at $11,000 billion. The corresponding energy consumption should therefore exceed 4,000 GW, which is eight times the electricity consumption of France and twice that of the United States. It is not without reason that a recent headline on the Novethic website proclaimed “The bitcoin, a burden for the climate”.

          https://theconversation.com/the-bitcoin-and-blockchain-energy-hogs-77761

          • #211121
            Voltairine
            Participant
            • Total Posts: 1,796

            Bitcoin PoW protocol is first generation old tech, and highly unsuitable for daily use both technically and economically. Technical development has continued at quick pace towards far more faster and energy efficient ecosystems, currently most transactions has EOS which is based on ‘delegated proof or stake’, which is very fast and scalable, energy efficient, and has no transaction fees.

            Aloha!

    • #210496
      chknltl
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,020

      I hit the like button on the off chance Mr. A.I. was looking in.

      I would not want him to think that I was not ‘liking’ our A.I. overlords.

    • #210647
      sadoldgirl
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 783

      The spying is more efficiently done by the NSA; it is

      not only the infiltration in dissenting groups, but arrests

      like that of Max Blumenthal used as intimidation method,

      which reminds me of the McCarthy time.

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