Freedom Rider: Russia, Afghanistan, and the Big Lie(Black Agenda Report)

Homepage | Forums | Main Forums | General Discussion | Freedom Rider: Russia, Afghanistan, and the Big Lie(Black Agenda Report)

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #333016
      Ohio Barbarian
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 14,654

      Freedom Rider: Russia, Afghanistan, and the Big Lie

      There is no end to the Russiagate fraud. All major charges have been disproved. No one was convicted of the dreaded “collusion” that was reported endlessly for the last four years. Damning information is now declassified and casts doubt on the veracity of the whole story. CrowdStrike, the Democratic National Committee cyber security firm, admitted under oath they had no proof of hacking by Russia or anyone else. Robert Mueller ended his two-year long, multi-million dollar investigation with nothing except convictions for process crimes.

      Why then did the New York Times print a story with an unnamed intelligence agency  source claiming that the Russian government paid the Taliban to kill American soldiers in Afghanistan? The charge is ludicrous on its face but the story is quite useful to people who want to hide their own criminality while simultaneously keeping Trump hamstrung in an election year.

      Russia is the nation least likely to do business with jihadists. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, jihadists nearly tore Russia apart. Separatists from the Chechnya region terrorized the entire country which was weakened and divided after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Because of that experience Russia eagerly assisted the United States after the September 11 attacks. Far from impeding the U.S. presence, Russia and other former Soviet republics were steadfast participants in the Northern Distribution Network  (NDN). NDN was a supply line carrying materiel from Russia, through central Asian nations and finally to Afghanistan. Russia allowed the use of its air space in troop transit flights. Far from being an enemy, Russia assisted the U.S. and its coalition in their fight against the Taliban.

      Russia’s NDN cooperation lasted until 2015, when U.S. meddling in Ukraine  poisoned relations between the two countries. Hostility towards jihadists remains a focus of Russian foreign policy decision making. The concern that ISIS might take control of Syria was the primary reason that Russia finally helped president Assad in 2015.

      Full article here

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

    • #333024
      salemcourt
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,483

      “The charge is ludicrous on its face but the story is quite useful to people who want to hide their own criminality while simultaneously keeping Trump hamstrung in an election year.” – particularly Biden’s criminality being covered up by MSM, and the proles just waiting to vote for him

    • #333026
      Passionate Progressive
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,173

      feed off a form of American exceptionalism as well as ignorance and illustrates the difference between the two perspectives employed by journalists that in an over simplified way may perhaps be characterized by the ‘national security’ lens vs. the ‘area studies’ lens.

      For me the latter perspective – i.e., seeing it through a scholarship of language appreciation and cultural history is a perspective that might be characterized as how the subject/country sees itself. This form of area studies scholarship – whether the subject was Africa or Latin America – lost popularity in the 1980’s.

      At the end of the 1980’s with the collapse of the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact alliance, this view was de-emphasized in the political science discipline – scholarship went the direction of political science, national securities studies and statistical analysis.   The collapse of the Soviet Union,  in the words of Francis Fukuyama (THE END OF HISTORY), for some scholars, validated the righteousness of liberalism which was equated to democracy.  In other words,  “the end-point of mankind’s ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy was the final form of human government.”

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_End_of_History_and_the_Last_Man

      This world view though discredited in some circles is reflected in Russophobia and Sinophobia and is generally a ‘zero-sum’ philosophy in that a win for one side is a loss for the other….The George W. Bush Presidency with withdrawal from arms control agreements and the rise of neocons in the Democratic Party (neocons from the Bush Administration contributed to the Obama Administration (Victoria Nuland, Susan Rice, Samantha Power) have brought this philosophy back.

      Unfortunately this type of scapegoating can be expected to continue.

      The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.....Martin Luther King '63

    • #333067
      Ohio Barbarian
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 14,654

      @passionateprogressive My BA is in History and Political Science, from the University of Texas. The one with the cow, not the symbol for a cash-dispensing machine. My political science studies were mostly area studies, but no professor who taught them was able to get tenure after Reagan got into office.

      Russia has had a long relationship with Afghanistan. They used it to their advantage in their Great Game with the British Empire in the 19th and 20th centuries, and then made the same mistake the British did in the 1980s–they tried to conquer it. Brezhnev must have been in cognitive decline or something. He should have known better. Stalin did.

      Anyone who had done an area study in that part of the world, which I had, knew that occupying Afghanistan was an act of imperial hubris that would not end well. Of course, nobody like that, like me, would have been hired in any administration since Carter’s.

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

    • #333082
      Passionate Progressive
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,173

      @ohiobarbarian

      one of Reagan’s ambassadors to Russia and the architect of detente had been an advocate of seeing problems from the other side’s perspective.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_F._Matlock_Jr.

      The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.....Martin Luther King '63

    • #333087
      Ohio Barbarian
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 14,654

      @passionateprogressive The denial of tenure thing really did happen, though.

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

    • #333096
      MizzGrizz
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,025

      ..a lot of mildly dissident profs in the eighties.

      My mother had her heart set on my marrying one of the type,a man who was very anti-Reagan and pro-Sandinista and who expressed those views in his English lit classes.No surprise he was denied tenure.He skedaddled out of the academy and went into public interest law.

    • #333184
      Red Cloud
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,404

      I am saying this for a friend (ahem). Somewhere nearby there is an institute of lowered learning. The learning used to be high caliber. Then the institute hired a religious moron Dean out of desperation due to a lack of late season candidates. The moron proceeded to be surrounded by the goody two shoes. They formed hiring committees and hired more fellow religious morons. Then one sad day one of their morons could not be on the committee so they asked my friend to serve.  A neophyte was running the selection committee and my friend had oodles of experience. My friend approached the neophyte and said if you need  advice just ask. The neophyte said the moron already advised whom the committee should nominate. My friend replied if you want to hire a colleague of yours you can be proud of do this:

      Make a list of all candidatures and rank them by strengths and weaknesses. Then after the interviews say WE THE 9 MEMBERS OF THIS COMMITTEE STRONGLY PREFER… (knowing the moron did not want 9 enemies.) It worked. Sadly only religious morons applied for a non-religious job. Word was out.

      Update: Moron has been lowered to an office flunkie by a new Dean. My friend galvanized the rest of the Division into realizing our new colleagues were all of the same suit. No new hires have been that way.

    • #333871
      Cold Mountain Trail
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 8,815

      “lost popularity in the 1980’s”

      not the only academic area that lost popularity or outright disappeared in the 80s.

      almost as if an edict came down.

    • #333961
      MizzGrizz
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,025

      @coldmountaintrail,is that even before the decision was made to dumb down curricula from grade school right on up through graduate studies,very few people were studying issues in school that would be relevant to an understanding of what went into the Russiagate hooey they are foisting on us—about media,Big Business, uses of propaganda throughout American history,and so on.

      Accidental or deliberate? I think we all know.

Viewing 9 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.