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Home Topics in Depth Science And Environment High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats

  • leftcoastmountains (1962 posts)
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    High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats

    The study shows that cats are exposed to chemicals found in electronics and furniture, chemicals that become dust and can adversely affect health. It is the first time that this connection has been verified. In a previous study, the researchers demonstrated that brominated flame retardants were found in higher concentrations in the blood of cats that had developed Feline hyperthyroidism (hyperthyroidism in cats) compared to healthy cats. Now, new measurements of healthy cats establish their dust exposure. Paired samples were taken from the same household, i.e. they took both dust samples and blood samples at the same time.

    Exposure to chemicals

    “By taking paired samples, we have greater insight into the environment that the cats live in. Moreover the cats in the study spent the majority of their time indoors and therefore air and dust in the home is expected to contribute more than the outdoor environment,” says Jana Weiss at the Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University.

    The results are very interesting because small children, notorious for putting everything in their mouths, have exposures to these chemicals similar to cats.

    “The brominated flame retardants that have been measured in cats are known endocrine disruptors. It’s particularly serious when small children ingest these substances because exposure during the development can have consequences later in life, such as thyroid disease,” says Jana Weiss.

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170224092516.htm

    bvar22, 7wo7rees, broiles and 4 othersMom Cat, twenty, LiberalArkie, NV Wino like this
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  • snot (636 posts)
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    1. Is there any reason to believe that what's accumulating in our cats

    isn’t accumulating in us?  (Maybe if we don’t lick ourselves too much . . . )

    ;)

    There is no responsibility, without freedom; no freedom, without power; no power, without knowledge; no knowledge, without love.
    • leftcoastmountains (1962 posts)
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      3. Click on link and scroll down the article, it mentions small children also.

      The results are very interesting because small children, notorious for putting everything in their mouths, have exposures to these chemicals similar to cats.

      “The brominated flame retardants that have been measured in cats are known endocrine disruptors. It’s particularly serious when small children ingest these substances because exposure during the development can have consequences later in life, such as thyroid disease,” says Jana Weiss.

      #CalExit #Trumpdoesn'tpaytaxeswhyshouldwe
  • broiles (526 posts)
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    2. What about in dogs?