I don’t know about the rest of you guys, but

Homepage | Forums | Main Forums | General Discussion | I don’t know about the rest of you guys, but

Viewing 15 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #337767
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      I have some pretty good neighbors. One of them is a fellow American. I’ve helped him out, and he’s helped me out. We’ve never expected any financial compensation for our actions, we’re happy that we can just help each other out when the need arises. And this neighborhood is pretty quiet– almost everything shuts down after 8:00 p.m. He will help me. and I will help him and his family, if the need arises. That’s the way it should be, I think.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337769
      David the Gnome
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,798

      Seriously, maybe I’m more emotional than usual today, but your post brought tears to my eyes.  My neighbors… I only know a couple of them – and one of them would probably condemn me as a heathen and be thrilled to shoot me.  What happened to America?  I do not know how we got where we are.

      • #337779
        ArtfromArk
        Participant
        • Total Posts: 1,154

        I knew all my neighbors, at least, I knew who they were, and that covered a fairly wide swath of about 1/3 square mile. There were 8 houses on my “block”, from one intersection of the street to the next one, and I had been in each one of those houses (with one curious exception)  by the time I was 11. I was also in various other houses in the neighborhood until I was about 14 or so. We were a pretty close knit, until someone’s dad got a raise and started “moving on up”, which in those days meant moving to the west side of town.   By the time I graduated from high school, no one knew anyone else.

        “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337772
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      Having neighbors you can really depend on helps to make life a LOT easier.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337785
      NV Wino
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 6,449

      I know the names in exactly two of those households. I don’t think anyone know (or remembers) my name.

      “As we act, let us not become the evil that we deplore.” Barbara Lee
      “Politicians and pro athletes: The only people who still get paid when they lose.” William Rivers Pitt

    • #337861
      wilsonbooks
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 133

      2 of my neighbors have also live in the houses that they grew up in.

      “I will tell you what I will do and what I will not do. I will not serve that in which I no longer believe, whether it calls itself my home, my fatherland, or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can and as wholly as I can, using for my defense
      the only arms I allow myself to use -- silence, exile, and cunning.”
      ― James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

    • #337878
      Mr. Mickeys Mom
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 4,861

      The smaller the town, the closer I seemed to be, which is to say in NY state, which has lots of small towns. Neighbors have never been bad to me, which is fortunate, but…

      It seems like I have to be the one that extends the hand, that knocks the door, or that runs for office, which pits everyone all of a sudden as your friend because they want to tell you what you should do because of their family. I see people who don’t know how to present themselves as a community. I see neighborhoods with kids the same age as being the ones that are a more cohesive tribe. I see (as an aging boomer) that other older people withdraw their role into “the neighborhood”. I sense a lot of what we used to call détente in the ill-at-ease to be more than briefly friendly or tolerant. I have one neighbor who still acts this way, I guess because she doesn’t like someone who ran for and worked hard at local office because I wasn’t a Republican. Go figure people…

      But, when it comes to people, it’s like ole Babs Streisand used to say… People who NEED people are the LUCKIEST people in the world, my friends.

       

      Hell, no... I'm not giving up...

    • #337948
      Cold Mountain Trail
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 10,610

      When I was a kid, everybody knew everybody on my street, at least to speak to, and nearly all the dads worked at boeing.

      In my immediate vicinity, everybody definitely knew everybody, though I wouldn’t say we were all having picnics together.  My family was actually kind of reclusive.  But everybody knew everybody well enough to trust their kids with the neighbors, for the entire day, with kids taking bike trips 10 miles away (it was suburban but with semi-rural lakes etc within close biking distance, and camping trips etc where one family would take some of the neighbor kids.

      It was kind of idyllic in many ways looking back.

      That lasted til I was in high school & we moved after that & the neighborhood changed, so I don’t think it lasted much after that, late 60s.

      I’m lucky to have near neighbors now that I like & trust, though a couple of my best neighbors just moved.  But I also cultivate that with conversation, christmas cards & candy, etc.

      The covid has cramped my style…

       

    • #338025
      FedUp
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 581

      The suburban Los Angeles area neighborhood in which I lived from 8-18 has changed a lot. Back in the 60’s everybody knew everybody. The dads worked in aerospace and the moms mostly stayed home. It was possible to own a home and raise a family on a single salary. There were problems that bubbled beneath the surface, but, for the most part, people were friendly and made a point of getting to know their neighbors. Today, the house that my parents sold in 1971 for $48,000 would sell for upwards of $3,000,000. Back in 2000, a surgeon bought the place and extensively remodeled it, adding 2000 square feet. My parents’ generation has almost completely died off and no one but the very wealthy can afford to buy there now. A few years ago my mom, then age 90, expressed the desire to meet the new owner and hear about the changes. I wrote a polite letter to the owner explaining who I was and included photos of the house as it was when we lived there. I asked if it would be possible to come by with my mother to say hello at the door. I did not ask to come inside or be given a tour of the property. By the response I received, you’d  have thought I was telling them I was going to rob the place. They left a one word text on my phone. “No.” The neighborhood has, indeed, changed.☹️

    • #338235
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      Contrast that to what I experienced in Kansas in 1980. My grandfather, who had grown up on a farm in NE Kansas, had a stroke. He often talked about his home town, so I decided to ride my bicycle up there to get some pictures for him.After 4 or 5 days on the road, I made it up to around the place he was talking about, but had no idea where to go from there. So I stopped at a place in a small town called Soldier, Kansas, and asked around and told people who I was. They gave me directions to my grandfather’s old farm house. So I knocked on the door of the farm house, told the occupants who I was, and they welcomed me, even letting me spend the night in my grandfather’s old homestead! It was so wonderful! The next day, they directed me to the local historian, who arranged for me to visit the house that my great-grandparents moved into after they had sold the farm. The people in the house took me on a tour, and arranged for me to meet a former classmate of my grandfather’s! She told me that my great-grandfather had taken my grandfather out of high school in his senior year, so that grandpa could spend another year working on the farm! So grandpa couldn’t graduate with his classmates! That had such an impact on grandpa that he never returned to his home town after he finally graduated from high school. He joined the army and ended up chasing after Pancho Villa in Mexico with General Pershing.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338243
      FedUp
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 581

      It’s still hard for me to believe a few years later that people could be so cold and uncaring as to turn away an elderly woman, but there you go. I felt bad for my mom who really is a sweetheart. She’s now 97 and more or less housebound. I’m glad your exploration of your grandfather’s roots was more productive with a better outcome. I am in touch with a realtor in  the old neighborhood and he has promised to take me through the house the next time it goes on the market.

    • #338248
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      that commemorates the Pershing Expedition and has my grandfather’s name on it! I don’t know if it existed in 1980.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338251
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      Certainly mine, since I cannot visit the USA right now unless it’s a family or legal emergency. (I can always go to the USA, but returning to Japan presents a serious problem at this time, due to the never-ending corona problem in the US.


      @coldmountaintrail

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338255
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      The longest I’ve lived in a single house is about 15 years.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338262
      Cold Mountain Trail
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 10,610
    • #338264
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,154

      :Sigh

      :

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338278
      chknltl
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,191

      When I lived a mere five miles away, on a road in very rural Pierce County Wa., I knew all of the neighbors from all eight of the five to twenty acre plots of land along our road.

      I knew their kids, I knew when to expect their school bus to pick them up in the morning and drop them off in the afternoon.

      We neighbors held yearly meetings to decide stuff about the shared road, how best to deal with mailbox bashings/robberies and discussed the odd cars that turned up parked on our road late at night.

      We held 4th of July party/feasts.

      We stopped and chatted with one another whenever we bumped into each other in town.

      We had each other’s phone numbers. If you needed help, any help, a neighbor was always there for you.

      We watched your house when you were at work or on vacation.

      We all got together when one of our houses was robbed and strategized methods to prevent it from happening again.

      We all cried when one of ours passed on.

      If you were short on firewood, we got together and fell a few trees, bucked them up and even stacked them in your woodshed.

      Some of us were Dems some Republicans, I a Progressive…we sorta forgave each other for their politics, being good neighbors was the priority.

      Looking back, we were what one would call “neighborly”

      At my new place, also in rural Pierce County Wa. just five or six miles away…

      …let’s see…there are, um… let me count them… maybe six to eight, eight acre plots of land and…um.. I think maybe nine homes.

      I know the name of the young mother who has a gang of kids across the way from my house.

      I do not the names of her kids but I do know the names of two of her dogs.

      Other than her, I know nobody else even though I’ve tried.

      Oh wait a minute, there is another lady…ok so that makes two names I know, she lives a bit further down the road, has a tiny dog named Winston.

      The only reason I sorta know her is because she relieved me from the honor of being the noob to our neighborhood.

      She is from Oklahoma and stopped me while I was walking my dog in order to get directions. Winston made sure I did not get too close to her car.

      The neighbors all wave at me…likely because I make sure that they see me waving at them first.

      Nobody has my number, nobody is willing to give out their number.

      Never has anyone outside of myself offered to give up a phone number in order that we might have a block watch.

      I DO love the new home, it is closer to Mt.Rainier, my view of it is lovely….but I wish I could import all the neighbors from my old neighborhood.

      Unlike my old neighbors, my new neighbors are anything but neighborly.

      That is my true “Tale Of Two Neighborhoods”

Viewing 15 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.