I know this is a kind of nosy question, but…

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    • #337727
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      How much is your yearly health insurance premium? I’m asking this to prepare for arguments for at least a Japanese-style national health insurance system in the US.

       

      I just got my bill for this year’s health insurance premiums in Japan. I’m single, over 60. My monthly premium in the national health care system (“Kokumin kenkou hoken”) will be the equivalent of $240/month. The plan covers 70% of any medical, dental, and other kinds of health care (like chiropractic) I might need that are considered “essential” (so no plastic surgery or dental implants). I am supposed to be eligible for free care once I turn 65. Anyway, medical costs are kept low by the government, so if I go in for chiropractic treatment, for example, my cost  is less than $10 per visit. Supplemental insurance is available for around $30/month for cases like if I had to spend an extended time in the hospital. There is also employer-based insurance (“shakai hoken”) as an alternative to the national health insurance, which is available to full-time workers. The premiums for the national health insurance are based on family size, income, and age. The premiums for the employer-based insurance, from what I’ve heard, are pretty much uniform, although they might go up with age.

       

      Anyway, in the national system, annual group check-ups (for cancer, etc) are available for a small fee. (This year, the check-ups have been postponed until the fall due to Covid). I could get certain cancer check-ups, for example, for less than $15 out of my own pocket. There are no deductibles in the Japanese system. The insurance kicks in the first time you use it, and there is no squabbling over who pays what.

       

      The Japanese government helps doctors to keep their equipment up-to-date, and Japanese doctors attend seminars, both in Japan and overseas. Life expectancy in Japan is the highest of any country with over 100 million population (one or two very small countries are rumored to have a higher life expectancy). In contrast, the US is #41 in average life expectancy.  Bankruptcy due to medical costs is almost unknown in Japan, although some families might go into debt to pay for extended care for a family member if they don’t have extended coverage.

       

      Because Japan wants to make sure future generations are healthy, some health care for children is free. There are also subsidies available for parents of young children.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337734
      ThouArtThat
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 4,544

      @artfromark

      Hi afm,

      I have no health care coverage because I am unable to afford it in the US.  The last time I checked it was going to cost 12K per year all in – 5,000 for the premium and 7,000 for the annual deductible.  So, before any benefit accrued to me, I would have to spend 12,000 up front.

      TAT

      “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."
      - John F. Kennedy

      "The further a society drifts from the truth the more it will hate those who speak it."
      - George Orwell

      "It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society."
      - Jiddu Krishnamurti

      "Sometimes a pessimist is only an optimist with extra information."
      - Idries Shah

      "A riot is the language of the unheard."
      - Martin Luther King

    • #337736
      David the Gnome
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 3,279

      We don’t learn a whole lot about each other if we don’t dare to ask them.

      I personally am disabled/on medicaid – and I am not certain what my fiance’s premiums are – beyond that they are somewhere over 100 a month.  That is not where the usual suspects make their money though.  That is in the deductibles and such.  Her deductible, as a reasonably healthy young woman, aged 28, gainfully employed, responsible, great credit and so on and so forth… is 5500 dollars.  She earns (net) around 25 or 26000 in a year.  Gall bladder issues caused her to more than meet that deductible last year – this year, she is well on her way, mostly for routine type things, or simple problems that really shouldn’t have a thousand dollar charge.

      One example of this is that she was charged one thousand dollars for a simple influenza test.  That issue is still being negotiated – but I don’t know if it will be resolved.  I think she pays about 200 dollars a month on her medical bills.  Normally, she also pays 200 dollars a month on her student loans – so the recent freeze on student loan payments has really helped…

      She has “coverage” through her work.  So if, in any given year, she has to go to the emergency room, or needs an MRI, a CT scan, or what have you… she will meet that 5500 dollar deductible again, at which point insurance will pay for… or is at least supposed to pay for the rest.  Currently the debt is around… 10k altogether?  I expect it will continue to go up.  As she makes regular payments, it hasn’t effected her credit yet… but if she loses her job, or some other bad thing happens… well…

      The entire American healthcare system is based around profit.  There are plenty of great nurses and doctors who also despise this – but there are some (I can’t stand most dentists, for example) who love it just the way it is.  There is also a growing number of “private” hospitals, primarily for use by wealthy individuals… and for some odd reason, they seem to have received the lion’s share of the recent stimulus money for “hospitals”.

      I wish America was more like Japan in this way… and in several other ways.

    • #337738
      Yanath
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,102

      Thankfully, all of it is paid for through the ACA.

      Public revenue already pays for much of our healthcare. It just does it in a wasteful, roundabout way that prioritizes profit for capitalists over a quality service for our society.

    • #337739
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      A “great” country would ensure that its citizens and residents don’t have to go bankrupt to live out their lives. I grieves me to hear that you would have to spend 12 grand out of your own pocket before your insurance would pay for anything. Really, the US should join the rest of the civilized world in helping its citizens to live their lives with peace of mind and help them to leave some of the fruits of their labor to their progeny.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337746
      Ohio Barbarian
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 21,914

      My employer, the county government, pays something like $217 a month. Copays are $15, an emergency room visit about $150, and generic prescription drugs are 100% covered. But I have what conservatives derisively call a platinum plan, and I’m in a small minority of American workers.

      I would also lose all of that coverage if I left or lost my job. With national health insurance, you don’t have to worry about that, and don’t have to keep working at a job you hate just to keep your insurance. I bet most Japanese haven’t even thought of that because they never had to. I know Canadians don’t.

       

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      You can jail a revolutionary, but you can't jail the revolution.--Fred Hampton

    • #337749
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      But then we got a Republican governor who trashed the ACA, and suddenly my family was facing a bill of thousands a month for her care. Who can afford that? My grandfather’s nursing home care 40 years before that was just $1000/month. It’s crazy! The system is designed to  bankrupt people in their old age. That is why I can NEVER vote for a Republican. That last good Republican I remember was Governor Winthrop Rockefeller of Arkansas, who served from 1967 to 1971. There were a few good Republicans on the national level in the 1970s, but they had virtually died out by the time Reagan came on the scene in the 1980s.

       

      I know a lot of people here don’t like today’s national Democrats, and I agree to a certain extent, but DAMN! Today’s Republicans tend to be MUCH worse!

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337751
      David the Gnome
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 3,279

      @artfromark

      The way I see it – the democrats are ignorant, greedy and corrupt.  The republicans are ignorant, greedy, corrupt – and have no conscience.  A choice of evils, I suppose.  Yet it need not be so.  Evil is evil.  As of right now… there is little leadership to look to – and less hope.  Breaks my heart every damn day to read about the madness.

    • #337752
      Fasttense
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,603

      If I go to the VA it is free, I’m disabled.

      If I use TriCare it costs anywhere between 40 to 20% of the bill plus sometimes a co-pay too. Obama and Trump have upped the cost of TriCare regularly. It’s what your family would use for their healthcare if you are retired military.

      Soon it will probobly cost about the same as any crappy plan offered by any crappy healthcare insurance corporation in America. They are vultures.

      Thank God for the VA. But they can’t offer a lot of things like dental, eye care, mental health care, therapy and mamograms. It surprised me they couldn’t offer grief counseling.

      But it’s still less than what most Americans pay.

       

    • #337753
      Punxsutawney
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 2,191

      It was ~$1,850 per month for Medical and Dental for a family out of pocket before copays and deductibles and that was the employee portion!!! So we bought our health care on the open market. It was about 8.5k a year for a plan with large deductibles and copays. I’m sure it would be closer to 10k nowadays though maybe less for a crappy state plan.

      In America, “Liberty” means “Free to Die in Service of Capital” - Amfortas the hippie.

      Most of today’s elites have the moral and social reasoning capacities of spoiled toddlers.

      “People of privilege will always risk their complete destruction rather than surrender any material part of their advantage...but the privileged also feel that their privileges, however egregious they may seem to others, are a solemn, basic, God-right. The sensitivity of the poor to injustice is a trivial thing c

    • #337759
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      The idiots I’ve encountered in social media who think that America’s health care system is the greatest in the world don’t have the foggiest clue about what the rest of the civilized world is like, and they don’t care. That is the kind of mindset we’re up against.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337774
      FedUp
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 672

      I’ll give you my mom’s stats. She’s 97. I take care of her fulltime. Paid help is out of the question. Medicare removes $144.60 every month out of her paltry SS check for the monthly premium. Her supplemental plan is another $240. So that’s $384.60 x 12 or $4615.20 and does not include prescription drug coverage which is an additional $31.00 a month and is a joke because her meds are still out of pocket expensive. She has no coverage for dental, hearing aids, or glasses and lives on SS and a miniscule pension. The US sucks!

    • #337776
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337778
      Thom Paine
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 317

      I believe the total cost of premiums for the typical employer-based coverage is around $22,000 per year.  Yes the employer pays a share but that from one’s compensation package so the employee is actually paying all.  In many if not most cases this coverage has copays and deductibles.  Plus little to none dental, vision and mental health coverage.

    • #337784
      Thom Paine
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 317

      I don’t know much about the ACA.  Do you get a subsidy that pays it all?

    • #337787
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      Every time I think about moving back to the US, I think about conditions like yours…

      It doesn’t have to be that way…

       
      <h2 class=”user-nicename”>@fedup</h2>

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337788
      Bernie Boomer
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 556

      I’m currently unemployed and so far have been unable to access the state system to apply for Medicaid coverage. The website is bolluxed up and I can’t get through on the phone. sigh
      Before that, I was working for the state on a contract without benefits, so I paid a heavily subsidized premium of $72.00 for what was, essentially, catastrophic coverage even though it was, technically, a “silver” plan. Since I’m not young, it was not a good choice, but it was all I could afford. The deductible was over $5000 and a co-pay to see a doctor was $40.  Of course no dental, vision, etc.

      Any system of government regulated care is going to be better than the cobbled mess of the ACA and the rapacious vulture insurance companies it was designed to serve us up to like tasty bits of decaying carrion. Japan’s system is not bad, though I think there are better ones. Ultimately, I’d prefer to get away from the terms ‘insurance’ and ‘premium’ in this country, because they are so wrapped into the current nightmare.

    • #337789
      ElfinWilde
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 279

      premium went up.  I was already paying  $10,680 per year for two people (myself and my son), both with no health problems, with a $6,000 deductible each, no family aggregate, and only paid 60% of covered medical/hospitalization costs.

      The premium was about to go up and I just could not afford it.

      My son aged out of being able to be on my policy and I decided to wait for Medicare.  Six more months until I can be covered by that.  If I only had to pay $240 a month, I’d still be covered.

      You are a child of the Universe, no less than the trees and the stars. You have a right to be here.

    • #337790
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      You’ve just made a case for me staying in Japan.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #337798
      salemcourt
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 3,025

      My employer pays more than 1,400 per month for me and my family (two kids and spouse).   I have about a 20K deductible which means that I have to pay the first 20,000 before the insurance kicks in 100%.  Rarely reach the 20K.   This is more like a catastrophic insurance than anything else.

    • #337805
      soryang
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,570

      as income goes up the subsidy goes down. there is a formula based upon two times the official poverty level and upon the number or persons in the household. If dependents are eligible to be covered under an employers plan, such as when I was an OTR driver working for a trucking company, you and your dependents are not eligible for the ACA whether you elected to cover yourself and your dependents or not. i got a silver ACA plan for my spouse after I retired and qualified for medicare. I got a silver plan because it has a drug plan benefit and a lower deductible. the huge premiums which are akin to a mortgage payment are partially defrayed by the ACA subsidy to wit, “modified ajusted gross income” less than 200 percent of poverty level. Earlier when working, I had elected coverage for the two of us from the employer provided BCBS plan with roughly the same benefits and deductibles, etc. for about 1000 a month. That covered both of us. After I stopped working, for about 70 percent of that out of pocket cost, we now only cover one of us under the ACA. Some would say we should go for the bronze plan and drop the drug coverage, and the premiums for my spouse would go way down but there is a potential large downside to letting drug coverage lapse, currently or down the road, especially if you have or will incur substantial prescription costs.

      Note I am not an attorney or CPA and this is not to be taken as legal advice. Consult a licensed professional advisor if you can’t understand the complex regulations pertaining to this bs system we have. Remember the ACA and especially the subsidy provisions are a tax law and affect tax reporting requirements.

    • #337828
      chknltl
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,428

      ….are fully propagandized into believing that health care in other countries is actually worse than U.S. health care system.

      One Conservative lady told me with ‘the greatest of authority’ that I should never consider moving to Canada because “their health care system sucks so bad!!!”

      “OK…what’s wrong with it?” I asked her…(well I had no idea where she might go with her answers so I wanted to be open minded).

      “Canadians all come here because our specialists are better and we have no long lines and the worst thing is that Canadians have ‘socialist’ health care”, she complained.

      Where to start….but start I did; “Um…I am a 100% disabled vet. I spend nothing whatever on my medical needs. My medical, including pharmaceutical and dental is covered by our government through the VA.”

      If I wanted specialized stuff like a favorite chiropractor, an acupuncturist, a cosmetic surgeon to give me a boob job, butt implants or any of the other kinds of stuff a guy like me is not in dire need of….

      ….I might have to go elsewhere but overall I am quite pleased with my “socialized” health care system.”, I told her. ”

      I went on, “I would want that same “socialized” system for you… and all of your loved ones… and for everyone in our country actually.”

      “Think of how wonderful it would be if you didn’t have to worry about walking into a hospital because you could not afford to do so.”

      “Co-pays would be gone…. …Yearly medical insurance bills would drop dramatically!”

      “But it could never be paid for”, she complained, “and if so then by who and at what cost to *our* taxes??”

      *(I understood her true meaning when she said “our” taxes…she meant to say ‘her taxes and to hell with everyone else’ but she didn’t want to come off as selfish)*.

      It is funny how the subject quickly changes when I point out how much of our taxes get spent on the Military Industrial complex…

      …or how much most American citizens pay anyway for their individual yearly average health care.

      Greatest health care system on the planet my butt! We don’t have such a critter- no way-no-how-end-of-story!

      IMHO, what I have is far better. It is a system we could have.

      Let me repeat that:

      I really do believe that all of us could have what I have!

      Each and every one of you SHOULD have it!

      THEN we could brag about having one of the greatest health care systems on the planet.

      It’s OUR country isn’t it?

      In a country Of, By and For “US”, one would think that WE could make this happen.

      Yeah I know….corporations and capitalism and bought-n-paid for politicians and yada yada….

      But there is a lot more of us than there are of them…

      …and we kinda still have a democracy. We still get to vote…even if we don’t get to count the actual votes.

      But if enough of us swarm the ballot boxes…if enough of us scream ENOUGH!!!..

      If every voter thought like I do…who knows what we might accomplish towards creating the Best Health Care On Earth

      Well that’s what I think at any rate.

       

    • #337868
      xyzse
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,790

      Hmmm.

      I guess mine is still somewhat decent in comparison but:

      • 20 Co-Pay
      • 50 Specialist
      • 150 ER

      Mind you, these are just base prices.  I can still get charged afterwards for something I don’t know.

    • #337877
      Cold Mountain Trail
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 12,932

      “The system is designed to  bankrupt people in their old age.”

      I completely believe that.  I’m over 60, currently pretty healthy, on no medications (I take 1/4 an aspirin & vitamins on my own advice).  But I’ve pretty much decided if I get anything serious (e.g. cancer) I won’t be treating it.  I’ve seen what happens through my own parents’ experience in the system and don’t want it for myself.   Hope I can stave off diabetes & HBP through keeping my exercise up & my weight down.

      I’d like to keep the few assets I have so I can at least gift my niece a Target gift certificate or something.  Don’t have kids but love having a niece.

    • #337889
      Ohio Barbarian
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 21,914

      @chknltl I’ve heard that kind of nonsense a lot, from Canadians, Brits, and Europeans who immigrated here. Unfortunately for them, I was lucky enough to have visited Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy and other European countries and found out what the people who actually live in them thought about their health care systems.

      Overall, they liked them and couldn’t imagine trading them for a for-profit insurance system.

      In my experience, most of the immigrants these days came to America so they could exploit the labor of others and be totally selfish right wing assholes. That’s my anecdotal experience, but the lady you talked to had no doubt had to deal with an actual functioning health care system.

      When my sister was in Paris she was hit by a car and her ankle was shattered. She was taken to hospital for surgery and rehab. She dreaded getting the bill. On her last day there, the French told her she was being released and bon voyage. When she asked them what the bill was, they were confused until one nurse told her, “You were injured in France. It was the duty of France to treat you as we would any French citizen. Consider it a gift if you like.”

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      You can jail a revolutionary, but you can't jail the revolution.--Fred Hampton

    • #337892
      PolecatHollerer
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,364

      I’m self-employed, and I simply don’t have the funds. If I get sick, I’m gonna die- that’s just how it is.

      If you give a man enough rope, it will be six inches too short. This is not the nature of rope- it is the nature of man.

    • #337974
      MikeW285
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 340

      Ours (my wife and I) is around 5-grand a year out of my paycheck. PCP deductible is 20 bucks, urgent care is 30, MRI and other stuff 100+ deductible. Not horrible. Very grateful to have this coverage, of course considering the fact that we really need Medicare For All.

    • #338012
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      That’s an amazing story about the care your friend received in Paris. In contrast, a few years ago I heard a Japanese researcher talk about his experience in Boston. He was having what he thought was the onset of a heart attack, so he called an ambulance. He said he rode around in the ambulance for two hours before they finally found a hospital that would accept his insurance! And even then, he got a hefty bill. Fortunately for him, his institute paid for it.

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338046
      snot
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,311

      because my income was below the Federal Poverty Line – it was too low to receive an ACA subsidy; and my state did not expand Medicaid.  So I paid over $14,000 for premiums, plus deductibles and co-pays… and this was for an HMO plan with a very tiny list of “in-network providers.”

      Destruction is easy; creation is hard, but more interesting.

    • #338231
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      @snot

       

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #338368
      Haikugal
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 2,328

      That’s the rub @artfromark I no longer consider the US a civilized country. We have become everything I’ve fought against. The right wing say that liberals hate Amerikkka but they don’t understand why because they drink the cool-aid.

      Why were you considering coming back?

    • #342688
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      I have inherited a nice piece of property in the US, surrounded by trees, that is occasionally visited by deer and little forest critters, in a rather quiet part of town that is just a stone’s throw from everything I would need for daily living that I can’t provide by myself. And as I grow older, I would have relatives there who would be able to check up on me on a regular basis. And the cost of living there (excluding medical) isn’t too high, compared to most of the US.


      @haikugal

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

    • #342690
      Hobbit709
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,655

      I’d be broke and dead.

      I don't waste my time teaching pigs to sing.

    • #342963
      eridani
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 10,290

      –which has my Medicare payment deducted from it.  I’ve got about $60/mo in drug expenses, and have not signed up for part D.  I do remember my monthly costs going down by 80% when i turned 65.

      Helpful hint–Improved Medicare for All would totally eliminate deductibles and co-pays for seniors as well as for everyone else.

      Jesus: Hey, Dad? God: Yes, Son? Jesus: Western civilization followed me home. Can I keep it? God: Certainly not! And put it down this minute--you don't know where it's been! Tom Robbins in Another Roadside Attraction

    • #343226
      carrotguy
      Blocked
      • Total Posts: 508

      $180/mo.   i declined a colonscopy because the facility fee was a little north of $2k but will get it in a couple of years

    • #343245
      Stockholmer
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 571

      pharma drugs, no price limit for anything.

      no premiums, that 385 usd (the dollar is weak atm versus the kronor, earlier it was less than 325 usd total) for a year is all inclusive (and I rarely hit the max for visits)

      the US healthcare systemic is a crime against humanity IMHO

    • #343253
      Haikugal
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 2,328

      @artfromark

      Thanks for answering…

      I have accepted the same situation as you describe and it has made it possible for me to still be alive. Had I struck out on my own again, as I intended to a couple of years ago I wouldn’t have found the surgeon who saved my leg and life. At the time I was heartbroken but it has become a life saver. I live in a small town and am just on the outskirts with much wildlife and close to everything I need. In other words, it sounds like a plan to me! Good luck with your new property and please keep us posted.

      May I ask if your property is in Ark? Thanks again..and I’m sorry I’m such a nosy person.

    • #343260
      ArtfromArk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,622

      Like I said, my inherited property, which is in the Arkansas Ozarks, has a lot of attractive features. If I were living in another state, it would be pretty easy to move there. But moving there from Japan would be a real reverse culture shock for me, I think, as I would have to get used to a system that has changed dramatically from the time I was growing up in the US. Although Japan has its disadvantages, where I’m living is pretty laid back, and it’s still pretty easy for me to get around. And there are people in my neighborhood who would be able to check up on me. For example, a couple of guys from the local disaster response team came by just this morning to make sure that someone would be able to check up on me in case there was a fire, major earthquake, etc.

       


      @haikugal

      “There’s a new spirit abroad in the land. The old days of ‘grab and greed’ are on their way out. We’re beginning to think of what we owe the other fellow, not just what we’re compelled to give him. The time’s coming… when we shan’t be able to fill our bellies in comfort while others go hungry, sleep in warm beds while others shiver in the cold.... And God willing, we’ll live to see that day…” Basil Rathbone,"Sherlock Holmes Faces Death" (Universal 1943)

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