• update

    The text box issue is fixed. You can now post just a title in replies again. Thank you Manny! Working on the rest. Thank you for your patience.

Home Topics in Depth Economics Lincoln and Marx The transatlantic convergence of two revolutionaries.

  • mother earth (371 posts)
    Profile photo of mother earth Donor

    Lincoln and Marx The transatlantic convergence of two revolutionaries.

    Lincoln and Marx
    The transatlantic convergence of two revolutionaries.

    Abraham Lincoln, as president, chose to reply to an “Address” from the London-based International Workingmen’s Association. The “Address,” drafted by Karl Marx, congratulated Lincoln on his reelection for a second term. In some resonant and complex paragraphs, the “Address” heralded the world-historical significance of what had become a war against slavery. The “Address” declared that victory for the North would be a turning point for nineteenth-century politics, an affirmation of free labor, and a defeat for the most reactionary capitalists who depended on slavery and racial oppression.

    Lincoln saw only a tiny selection of the avalanche of mail he was sent, employing several secretaries to deal with it. But the US Ambassador in London, Charles Francis Adams, decided to forward the “Address” to Washington. Encouraging every sign of support for the Union was central to Adams’s mission. The Emancipation Proclamation of January 1863 had made this task much easier, but there were still many sections of the British elite who sympathized with the Confederacy and some who favored awarding it diplomatic recognition if only public opinion could be brought to accept this.

    The “Address” carried, beside that of Marx, the signatures of several prominent British trade unionists as well as French socialists and German social democrats. The Ambassador wrote to the IWA, explaining that the president had asked him to convey his response to their “Address.” He thanked them for their support and expressed his conviction that the defeat of the rebellion would indeed be a victory for the cause of humanity everywhere. He declared that his country would abstain from “unlawful intervention” but observed that “The United States regarded their cause in the present conflict with slavery-maintaining insurgents as the cause of human nature, and they derived new encouragement to persevere from the testimony of the working men of Europe.”

    Continued:  https://www.jacobinmag.com/2012/08/lincoln-and-marx/

    canoeist52, snot, leveymg and 1 otherChefEric like this
    Democracy, in this late stage of capitalism, has been replaced with a system of legalized bribery. All branches of government, including the courts, along with the systems of entertainment and news, are wholly owned subsidiaries of the corporate state. Electoral politics are elaborate puppet shows.- Chris Hedges

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

▼ Hide Reply Index
8 replies
  • leveymg (2714 posts)
    Profile photo of leveymg

    1. The monarchies of old Europe once regarded the US as a radical

    Republic, dangerously democratic, a place of revolution without any restraining established social or religious order.

    We were once a truly great nation.

    • mother earth (371 posts)
      Profile photo of mother earth Donor

      2. I think we can be once again if we stop using "party" labels as our identity.

      What it is going to take is unity, revolutionary unity, common ground issues must be addressed like never before.  No more of this divide & conquer that marginalizes our voices & offers the party of oligarchy (and by that I mean BOTH of the established two).

      There’s a reason why they’ve made socialism a boogieman, our brand is like none other, it’s time to embrace it, and practice it.  Reform, stamping out corruption, equality, are the earmarks of activism, which also is what they seek to equate with terrorism.  Who are the real terrorists?  We all know the answer.

      There’s a reason why populism is growing in strength, that too is part of our rich history.  Trump doesn’t even come close to be a populist, he talks like he is, his actions are still part of the established pretense.  That’s why Bernie won our hearts, but he’s been hijacked for now.

      Democracy, in this late stage of capitalism, has been replaced with a system of legalized bribery. All branches of government, including the courts, along with the systems of entertainment and news, are wholly owned subsidiaries of the corporate state. Electoral politics are elaborate puppet shows.- Chris Hedges
  • Fasttense (1399 posts)
    Profile photo of Fasttense Donor

    3. I've recently reread some of Karl Marx and I have to admit

    The man was a genius. He describes globalization, free trade and our political situation to a tee. It just amazes me that a man from the 1800s was more informed about economics than most of our congress and presidents.

    And yet…the US doesn’t teach him even in college economic classes.

    • pinduck (1109 posts)
      Profile photo of pinduck Donor

      4. I think Prof. Wolffe might be the only radical economist left in a major

      university. The war on Marxian analysis, and those who employ it, has nearly extirpated those who have correctly predicted the course of capitalism. It’s been 50 years since Baran & Sweezy’s “Monopoly Capital” was published and they, along with hints from Uncle Whiskers, correctly foresaw the rise of global monopoly capitalism; recognized that stagnation would become the default condition of the political economy; and predicted the rise of financialization. That capitalism would engender imperialism was duly noted.

      Since the late 1950’s, industrial production and financial speculation have traded %’s of the American economy. Industry produces things people can use(mostly); and Big Finance is a parasite on the economy and the workers who make it go.

      Marx and Engels were active in agronomy and the social sciences. At age 24, Engels published a book on the diseases of the working class due to their poor physical condition stemming from slave type wages and consequent poor nutrition. Marx wrote on the poor quality of bread available to the working class.

      "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
      • Fasttense (1399 posts)
        Profile photo of Fasttense Donor

        5. I wish I could read the original German.

        But some translations are pretty good. I haven’t gotten into Engels yet. I might try some of his translations next.

        • pinduck (1109 posts)
          Profile photo of pinduck Donor

          7. It would be nice to read some of this material in the original language but

          history marches on and those who use Marxian analysis are in control of their material and I read them instead of the original in translation. We would not be where we are in understanding global financial capitalism without M&E certainly, but events have continued and need to be studied and reported.

          It is like reading Darwin: It’s excellent to see a first class mind of work but he had no knowledge of genetics so his insights are now limited even though his work is still providing many areas for research.

          "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."
      • FanBoy (7985 posts)
        Profile photo of FanBoy

        6. Read out of economics departments since the 80s step by step; part of

        the totalizing program

        • pinduck (1109 posts)
          Profile photo of pinduck Donor

          8. Yes, exactly – there are Marxian student of the political economy in

          such departments as sociology, agronomy, ecology but the economics departments have pretty well purged heterodox professors.

          All that is left is varying shades of apologists for global monopoly capitalism and it’s a debased field, in my opinion If anyone wants to see McCarthyism in action, look no farther then Economics departments in all the universities.

          "Sometimes I feel like Fletcher Christian..."