NASA’s Curiosity rover video shows a fresh panoramic view of Mars

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    • #443505
      eridani
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      https://www.engadget.com/nasa-jpl-curiosity-rover-gale-crater-panorama-085647064.html

      NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory released a breathtaking panorama of the inside of the Gale Crater, as snapped by the Curiosity Rover. To celebrate the Rover’s ninth — ninth! — year surveying the red planet, the clip shows off where the Rover has been, where it’s going and what we’ve learned in the last decade. This includes the breathtaking fact that, on a clear winter’s day when there’s no dust in the air, you can see close to 20 miles.

      NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory released a breathtaking panorama of the inside of the Gale Crater, as snapped by the Curiosity Rover. To celebrate the Rover’s ninth — ninth! — year surveying the red planet, the clip shows off where the Rover has been, where it’s going and what we’ve learned in the last decade. This includes the breathtaking fact that, on a clear winter’s day when there’s no dust in the air, you can see close to 20 miles.

      The panoramic shot, reported earlier by Gizmodo, shows Curiosity’s journey up the side of Mount Sharp, and the detour it had to take in order to avoid a large sheet of Martian sand. While the rover journeyed up the side, the composition of the rocks changed from a clay-rich base to one full of sulphide. As Deputy Project Scientist Abigail Fraeman explains, researchers are hoping to learn a little more about how Mars lost its water (the Gale Crater used to be a lake, after all) and how long it took before it became the dry desert planet we see before us.

      Jesus: Hey, Dad? God: Yes, Son? Jesus: Western civilization followed me home. Can I keep it? God: Certainly not! And put it down this minute--you don't know where it's been! Tom Robbins in Another Roadside Attraction

    • #443507
      eridani
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      https://bigthink.com/technology-innovation/ai-artificial-intelligence-craters-mars

      The MRO has been taking photos of the Red Planet’s surface for 15 years now, and in that time, it has snapped 112,000 lower-resolution images, with each covering hundreds of miles of the Martian surface. To free scientists from the burden of manually analyzing all those photos, researchers trained an algorithm to scan the same images for signs of new craters on Mars — and it only needs about five seconds per picture.In October, NASA confirmed that the AI had discovered its first fresh craters on Mars, and to date, it’s helped scientists spot dozens of new impacts in the Context Camera images.

      “The data was there all the time,” JPL computer scientist Kiri Wagstaf told Wired. “It’s just that we hadn’t seen it ourselves.”

      In the future, the AI might help scientists identify more craters on Mars — potentially within weeks of their formation — or even craters on other planets. “The possibility of using machine learning to really delve into large data sets and find things that we otherwise wouldn’t have found is really exciting,” Ingrid Daubar, a planetary scientist who helped create the AI, told Wired. “This is just beginning,” she added. “We’re looking forward to finding a lot more.”To train their image-analyzing AI to spot new craters on Mars, the researchers started by feeding it nearly 7,000 images from the Context Camera. Some featured fresh craters confirmed by HiRISE photos, and others didn’t. After training, the next step was letting the algorithm analyze all of the Context Camera images.

      Jesus: Hey, Dad? God: Yes, Son? Jesus: Western civilization followed me home. Can I keep it? God: Certainly not! And put it down this minute--you don't know where it's been! Tom Robbins in Another Roadside Attraction

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