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  • Scott Crowder (443 posts)
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    New report exposes fake Russia narrative.

    https://www.thenation.com/article/a-new-report-raises-big-questions-about-last-years-dnc-hack/

    Forensic investigators, intelligence analysts, system designers, program architects, and computer scientists of long experience and strongly credentialed are now producing evidence disproving the official version of key events last year. Their work is intricate and continues at a kinetic pace as we speak. But its certain results so far are two, simply stated, and freighted with implications:

    There was no hack of the Democratic National Committee’s system on July 5 last year—not by the Russians, not by anyone else. Hard science now demonstrates it was a leak—a download executed locally with a memory key or a similarly portable data-storage device. In short, it was an inside job by someone with access to the DNC’s system. This casts serious doubt on the initial “hack,” as alleged, that led to the very consequential publication of a large store of documents on WikiLeaks last summer.
    Forensic investigations of documents made public two weeks prior to the July 5 leak by the person or entity known as Guccifer 2.0 show that they were fraudulent: Before Guccifer posted them they were adulterated by cutting and pasting them into a blank template that had Russian as its default language. Guccifer took responsibility on June 15 for an intrusion the DNC reported on June 14 and professed to be a WikiLeaks source—claims essential to the official narrative implicating Russia in what was soon cast as an extensive hacking operation. To put the point simply, forensic science now devastates this narrative.

    ...Under no circumstance can it be acceptable that the relevant authorities—the National Security Agency, the Justice Department (via the Federal Bureau of Investigation), and the Central Intelligence Agency—leave these new findings without reply. Not credibly, in any case. Forensic investigators, prominent among them people with decades’ experience at high levels in these very institutions, have put a body of evidence on a table previously left empty. Silence now, should it ensue, cannot be written down as an admission of duplicity, but it will come very close to one. 

     

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25 replies
    • elias39 (3492 posts)
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      1. But still the DNC clings to conspiracy theories and Russia.

      Sigh.

      I hate conspiracy theorists.

      “Name, no, nothing is nameable, tell, no, nothing can be told, what then, I don't know, I shouldn't have begun.” ― Samuel Beckett, Stories and Texts for Nothing
    • spud demon (955 posts)
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      2. forensic overreach

      I accept that experts can tell the difference between files copied from the server and messages downloaded using a mail client with a stolen/guessed/cracked password.

      However, a hacker who gains privileged shell access can remotely make his own zip file and transfer it, maybe put it on a memory stick later.  Since the DNC did not make their servers available to investigators, I don’t see how they could rule that out.

      I’m not saying that it wasn’t an insider with physical access, just that we haven’t seen proof.

      Cubs, Google+, Weird Al, BMW
      • dreamnightwind (1084 posts)
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        3. They showed that the copy speed exceeded remote transfer speeds

        meaning that someone physically copied the data locally, unconstrained by network speed (in contrast to a remote shell). That’s my understanding of their claim. I haven’t looked into it any further than that, but it does make sense to me.

        • spud demon (955 posts)
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          10. If you enter a "zip" command remotely

          it creates the zip file on the server, unconstrained by network speed.

          Would a hacker do that?  Make a zip file when they could transfer the files individually?  Maybe not, but I don’t see a way to rule it out.

          Cubs, Google+, Weird Al, BMW
          • ThinkingANew (1271 posts)
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            17. If that were the case it would be noted

            As it would have created zip files on the drive. I don’t think that is a factor.

            "(modern) newspapers publish nothing more than “weaponized text"" “When you read a newspaper article, you are reading weaponized text that is designed to affect a person just like you." Julian Assange  
      • bemildred (4108 posts)
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        6. The size and name of the transferred files are known from metadata.

        Has to be to reassemble the packets.

        Zipping it beforehand does not change that, or the copy speed. Copy speed depends on the slowest link in the transfer, one of: local drive, network path, and remote drive. Since the supposed destination drive would be OUTSIDE the local network, like in Russia, network latency can be expected to be very high. Thumb drives are generally fast read and slow write, so the destination drive would not likely be a thumb, they are in a hurry. With two local drives on a local machine or the local network, the destination thumb becomes the slow link, and it governs the speed of the transfer, which is still way better than a slow link to Russia or Romania or New York for that matter. Even local fast ethernet will piss all over your day if you have a lot of stuff to move, not because it is slow, but because of network latency.

        https://www.lifewire.com/latency-on-computer-networks-818119

        It ain't the things you don't know that hurts you, it's the things you know that ain't so.
        • spud demon (955 posts)
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          11. I don't think latency matters when you're subtracting time stamps.

          It adds roughly the same amount to all of them.  The differences depend on throughput.  Zipping the file does change it, because it makes everything one file.  When you unzip it on the other end, it will either create new timestamps (close together, assuming you unzip locally) or use the original ones saved inside the zip.

          Cubs, Google+, Weird Al, BMW
          • bemildred (4108 posts)
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            12. Yeah, you're right.

            I think it’s even messier than that, now I think about it. For example, IIRC, you can set dates when you write a zipfile, or unzip it, or not.

            And I used to use network pipes with tar to move data all over the place, where you can set dates too.

            And I think operating systems matter.

            And as I mentioned thumb speeds are asymetric.

            Time stamps are editable.

            But I’d still bet on a thumb drive on the same machine.

            It ain't the things you don't know that hurts you, it's the things you know that ain't so.
          • bemildred (4108 posts)
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            14. Here you go:

            This study analyzes the file metadata found in a 7zip archive file, 7dc58-ngp-van.7z, attributed to the Guccifer 2.0 persona.    For an in depth analysis of various aspects of the controversy surrounding Guccifer 2.0, refer to Adam Carter’s blog, Guccifer 2.0: Game Over.

            https://theforensicator.wordpress.com/guccifer-2-ngp-van-metadata-analysis/

             

            It ain't the things you don't know that hurts you, it's the things you know that ain't so.
            • spud demon (955 posts)
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              15. Thanks for the technical link

              I’m still reading, but so far I haven’t seen anything that excludes my zip file theory (which I admit is less likely than the memory stick theory).

              Cubs, Google+, Weird Al, BMW
              • bemildred (4108 posts)
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                16. Yeah, I have to read it now.

                I think your theory is perfectly sound, the only real flaw I see is a meta-flaw: I see little indication these guys were very sophisticated, but then you can argue sophisticated guys would make it look like that (which could get time consuming).

                It ain't the things you don't know that hurts you, it's the things you know that ain't so.
                • ThinkingANew (1271 posts)
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                  18. zip files created at the time would be noted

                  Performance monitoring was in place. If they were observing disk io and network they certainly were observing what was running (zip?) and what was happening with disk space.

                  All those metrics are well available in modern server environments.

                  "(modern) newspapers publish nothing more than “weaponized text"" “When you read a newspaper article, you are reading weaponized text that is designed to affect a person just like you." Julian Assange  
                • ThinkingANew (1271 posts)
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                  19. Hmm, actually from the data that has been made available

                  it sounds like they determined the “copy  speed” by the file attributes?

                   

                  "(modern) newspapers publish nothing more than “weaponized text"" “When you read a newspaper article, you are reading weaponized text that is designed to affect a person just like you." Julian Assange  
                  • bemildred (4108 posts)
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                    22. Pretty much.

                    The create and modify times for the files, and how they are changed by certain utilities on Un*x and Windoze.

                    I’ve done a good deal of that, lots of heterogenous networks. But it’s been 15 years. And I’m an old fart, lazy, feeble.

                    I read through it, did NOT grovel over his numbers in detail, I expect someone else will do that for me, and what I can say is it is a plausible explanation, for what I see. I know the programs he is talking about WinRAR, cp, some the many zips, NTFS, FAT, ext4, and they do what he says, or did. It’s consistent with what they say about Seth Rich’s expertise & experience too, the tools used, the bootable thumb.

                    It ‘s going to be slow as snot sliding down a glass slide, and I think that’s why he only took a fraction. Many is the time I have said fuck it and started looking for something faster. Hence: “Let’s put it on an NTFS hard drive” to make a teaser subset, which I might suppose was what was handy.

                    I have always considered the Guccifer2.0 story to be bullshit, because of the claim that he was somewhere is Europe when he did it, just no idea what else it might be. And that seems to be the main point, it does pretty much make a local copy necessary to get the copy speed, which is what I expect with a slow thumb.

                    So plausible: yes, better than anything else on offer: yes, proof: no.

                    It ain't the things you don't know that hurts you, it's the things you know that ain't so.
                  • bemildred (4108 posts)
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                    23. I wonder how forensicator got into the locked sub-directory archives too.

                    Did he crack them or get a passcode somewhere? Well if he did, where? Lots to investigate.

                    It ain't the things you don't know that hurts you, it's the things you know that ain't so.
    • RufusTFirefly (1513 posts)
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      4. And the careers of the corporate media stooges who've been pushing this lie…

      … probably won’t be damaged at all.

      • Coldmountaintrail (989 posts)
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        5. they never seem to be damaged by their lies – only for their

        politics (e.g. phil donahue)

    • ZimInSeattle (1152 posts)
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      7. New York Magazine trying desperately to debunk The Nation piece:

      The Nation Article About the DNC Hack Is Too Incoherent to Even Debunk

       

      "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" - JFK | Bernie would have WON! |“The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness" - J.K. Galbraith |“Fascism is a result of the failure of the left to provide an alternative” - Leon Trotsky | Sanders/Gabbard 2020 (PPP)
      • Scott Crowder (443 posts)
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        8. So the New York Magazine is counting on reader stupidity.

        Makes sense.  TPTB largely depend upon and cultivate stupidity of the masses.

        • ZimInSeattle (1152 posts)
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          9. Yes, there's some good push back in the comments to that article.

          "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" - JFK | Bernie would have WON! |“The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness" - J.K. Galbraith |“Fascism is a result of the failure of the left to provide an alternative” - Leon Trotsky | Sanders/Gabbard 2020 (PPP)
      • Wood (1093 posts)
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        13. this is desperate all by itself: don't even need to read the whole sentence

        “This should, already, set off alarm bells: An anonymous analyst is claiming to have analyzed….”

        "All things wrong will move on if you let them."  - Prem Rawat
        • Scott Crowder (443 posts)
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          20. Yeah, someone should tell that to

          William Binney, NSA technical director, Kirk Wiebe, senior analyst, NSA SIGINT ARC, Edward Loomis, Technical Director NSA Office of Signal Processing, and Ray McGovern, former Chief of CIA Soviet Foreign Policy Branch.

          • Wood (1093 posts)
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            21. irony: does NYmag provide named intelligence sources & their analyses.. nope

            but OTHER anonymous sources are not acceptable.

            "All things wrong will move on if you let them."  - Prem Rawat
    • RedCloud (80 posts)
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      24. If you guys are wrong, you err to Trump's side.

      But then again this could be your motive. I will trust my Russian sources who were complaining about their government’s oligarch’s helping Trump years ago. Russian media were hysterical predicting a war with the USA if Clinton got elected.

      Then it only takes a handful of orchestrated “patriots” for the comrade land, to do the dirty work.

      Your Trump hid his conversation with your Putin. That says volumes right there.

      • yurbud (85 posts)
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        25. there is definitely something to his business angle and possibly quid pro quo…

        But for some reason, the Democrats are focusing on this email nonsense and at some points, even suggesting Russia tampered with vote tallies (as if the GOP couldn’t and haven’t done that all by themselves).

        The corruption angle would be extremely easy to prove, but Democrats are avoiding that because it’s the mother’s milk of most politicians in both major parties.