Sunday Trivia – 25 April – Hogsback

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    • #419426
      HassleCat
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      Here is a photo of a well known hogback in Utah. This one was formed by erosion from both sides. There is another, more common process that forms a hogback or hogsback. What is that process? If you were a scientist studying hogbacks, what kind of scientist would you be? What nae might you use instead of “hogback?”

    • #419427
      jbnw
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      And in that region, don’t they also come from lava? I’d likely just call it a ridge, or even a lava ridge.

    • #419429
      jbnw
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      then I think you’d be a vulcanologist.

    • #419433
      jbnw
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      for glaciologists (?) but are that looks like a BIG ridge!

      • #419439
        HassleCat
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        You got it. A glacier usually leaves a lateral morraine on each side. If two glaciers converge, they will create a medial morraine between them. These deposits will eventually become rounded and softened by erosion, perhaps covered by trees, leaving little evidence of how they were formed. The one in Utah is too big to be a morraine, as you say. That one was formed by erosion from both sides, leaving only a narrow strip of the original plateau between the two river valleys.  @jbnw

    • #419437
      jbnw
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      looks like they could be large enough 🙂

      • #419442
        HassleCat
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        Here is a picture of two hogbacks being formed by a glacier. You can see how the glacier deposits parallel rows of debris on each side, leaving a ridge of rubble that resembles a hog’s back. If you study things like this, you might be a physical geographer, a geomorphologist or a glaciologist. You would refer to a hogback as a lateral moraine. The other photo shows two converging glaciars squeezing a medial morraine between them.

         

    • #419503
      Cold Mountain Trail
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      thelast 2 photos though show two hills/ridges on either side of a glacier, not a glacier slicing off the top of a hill/ridge ??

      • #419522
        HassleCat
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        The Utah hogsback was not formed by a glacier. It was created when two parallel rivers eroded away at the plateau between them, leaving the thin strip with the highway. The highway was built later, of course, not created as original equipment. The other way to make a hogsback, the more common way, is to have a glacier deposit lateral and medial morraines. Eventually, the glacier goes away, leaving long rows of rubble. Erosion then smooths the contours of the morraine, and nature covers it with vegetation, disguising the fact that it’s a glacial deposit. There are thousands of hogsbacks all over the country, but most people don’t realize they are relics of the last ice age. The glacier photos show lateral and medial morraines in the process of being deposited, but it will be a long time before the glaciers recede and leave the morraines to become hogsbacks.

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