Trivia – 8 Sep – Bicycles

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    • #356136
      HassleCat
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      You will think, “Oh, Fudge! I would have to be a bicycle mechanic to know this!” But the answer is more of a logic problem, and you can get it without knowing very much about bicycles.

      View post on imgur.com

    • #356137
      Jan Boehmerman
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    • #356140
      jbnw
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      So you use the correct pedal on the correct side so pedaling keeps the pedals on instead of spinning them them off the cranks.

      I think D would be “droit” for right, but I checked – left is gauche.  Sans droit – not right?

    • #356141
      Jan Boehmerman
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    • #356143
      HassleCat
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      @jbnw Left nd right. French pedals are marked G & D, just as you said, for gauche and droit. Italian pedals are marked S & D for sinestra and destra.

      See how easy that was!

    • #356144
      HassleCat
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      I have nt seen pedals marked in German, but they would ne L & R, just as in English.

    • #356145
      jbnw
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    • #356146
      NV Wino
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      “As we act, let us not become the evil that we deplore.” Barbara Lee
      “Politicians and pro athletes: The only people who still get paid when they lose.” William Rivers Pitt

    • #356148
      RufusTFirefly
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      I don’t know the Italian word for right offhand, but as a lefty (in more ways than one) I know that “left” is sinistra – or something mighty close. Given than Italian and French are both Romance languages, it seems like that Italian “right” is similar to the French droit.

    • #356149
      HassleCat
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      Answer: Bicycle pedals are marked left and right. The left pedal has a left-hand thread, and screws in “backward” compared to the usual “right-to-tight” threading of most bolts. The right pedal has a more typical right-hand thread. The different thread directions help prevent the pedals from coming loose during riding. The pedals are marked left and right because installing the right pedal in the left side will cause expensive damage, stripped threads on the crank arm.

      Here is a photo of Tulio Campagnolo and his invention, the quick release system for bicycle wheels. Before the quick release, wheels on racing bicycles were held in place with oversized wing nuts. Campagnolo was inspired to invent the quick release by a bad experience with the old wing nuts. He needed to change a flat tire, but his hands were cold, and he could not loosen the wing nuts.

      View post on imgur.com

    • #356150
      NV Wino
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 5,839

       

      “As we act, let us not become the evil that we deplore.” Barbara Lee
      “Politicians and pro athletes: The only people who still get paid when they lose.” William Rivers Pitt

    • #356151
      HubHeaver
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      • Total Posts: 441

      speed and distance

      Page Not Found

    • #356152
      jbnw
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      What is the improvement related to wheels??  Bicycles don’t work if the pedals don’t spin (well, maybe a rod would work) and stay attached . . .

      Wire spokes, maybe?

    • #356153
      So Far From Heaven
      Keymaster
      • Total Posts: 6,930

      My Gitane doesn’t have marked pedals @hasslecat

      They just assume I not stooopid and would see the left and right threading.

      Of course the fucking threads are fine, so unless you REALLY paid attention to whataever the fuck you was doing you’d cross thread one and have to replace the crank. I know from experience that this is true. Racing cranks ain’t real cheap, either.

    • #356156
      HassleCat
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      Back in the day, French bikes had French threads, so the pedals on your Gitane would fit only French cranksets, like Stronglight.

      • #356161
        So Far From Heaven
        Keymaster
        • Total Posts: 6,930

        This is 2020 and I bought the thing in 1972, a very good year @hasslecat so that’s what, 48 years old.

        Fuck I’m getting old.

        And yes the damn thing is French threaded. As in very fine threads which is actually the opposite of what a good engineer would use. The cast aluminum cranks SHOULD be fitted with right and left coarse threads for strength between the pedal shaft and crank eye.

        Worse yet, the cranks wallow out at the other end, which has a tapered square peg and hole. If you REALLY push the thing, the peg really washes out the crank. And that can be entirely hazardous to your health if you’re pushing it around a corner.

        But you ain’t NEVER had a ride like a Gitane race model. And brakes to die for. And superior sew-ups and all that shit. You gotta buy very specialized spokes if you re-spoke or you lose that Gitane feel.

    • #356157
      HassleCat
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      @hubheaver You change pedals every day, sometimes in the middle or a ride.

    • #356160
      Jan Boehmerman
      Moderator
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      • #356163
        So Far From Heaven
        Keymaster
        • Total Posts: 6,930

        a little stroll along a highway sometimes @janboehmermann

        A friend and I were prepping for the annual Crest Ride (think 15 miles where you go up a mile or more on a itty bitty 2 lane highway) by doing the Tramway road two or three times a day. the tramway road went from the interstate straight for the most part from the valley of Albuquerque to the base of Sandia. Climb about 5000 feet or so. The end of this shit road was so fucking steep you get rigor mortise where you can’t go forward.

        BUT

        The return is even worse. Since it’s one mother hill all the way to the bottom a few miles below, you push it to the absolute max and let your hair catch fire. Well over 50 to 60 mph.

        Until a fucking bus passes on the other side of the road.

        Air blasts you off the highway into the sand and you attempt to try and keep from going into the barb wire fences. And eat a shit load of sand. And bleed a bit. And you gotta make damn good and sure you no hit cactus or whatever. That’s a real fucking hurt all its own.

        And, since you have sew ups and super light weight rims, you get to try to straighten those out enough to continue to be able to ride your bicycle.

    • #356167
      RufusTFirefly
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 2,432

      @sffh

      I remember when Simplex was the state-of-the-art “affordable” derailleur. (Unfortunately, the lightweight plastic parts tended to dissolve over time.) Of course, we all aspired to Campagnolo.

      • #356172
        So Far From Heaven
        Keymaster
        • Total Posts: 6,930

        had a lot of different derailleurs out then if I remember right @rufustfirefly . It’s a simplex but all metal. An almost perfect copy of the Camp.

        The worst thing about the damn Gitane was the grips. Damn things always came undone, and they always did their best to drive you crazy when you really needed the fucking things.

        That and the crank wash. I could leg press a whole shitload in those days, and I’m really tall and put those together and my cranks washed all the fucking time. So I gave up on pushing it too hard and saved a shitpot of money. Rode the thing through at least four sets of rims and spokes. And three sets of pedals though one change was to get rid of the racing pedals and get some that worked with shoes.

    • #356176
      So Far From Heaven
      Keymaster
      • Total Posts: 6,930

      @rufustfirefly ??

      It’s been in storage for at least 25 years or so. In the attic.

      You’d need to tune the spokes and put on new rubber. And re-wrap the fucking grips probably.

      Other than that, it’ll fly like a bird.

    • #356182
      Pam2
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      • Total Posts: 6,237

      Only 90 mins late. Congrats @jbnw

       

    • #356183
      jbnw
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      @pam2 and it sounds like plenty of others know details too!

    • #356184
      Pam2
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 6,237

      @jbnw

      I wasn’t a contender even if I had been on time!

    • #356185
      HassleCat
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      @sofarfromheaven Oh yeaaahhh! I picked up a used Peugeot, a PFN10e as I recall. It came with 8 extra silk sewups. Man! That thing was smooth. I left it at my parents’ house when I was in the military and it disappeared. The old Mafac center pull brakes were wonderful. People pay a lot of money for some of those old components like the Mafac brakes, Simplex Retrofriction shifters, Huret Duopar derailleurs, etc. I still like the feel of a steel frame bike. Just nostalgic, I guess. Oh, the spokes. They liked butted spokes in those days. They were 15 gauge at the ends, and 17 gauge in the middle. They gave the wheels a nice feel, but they were delicate. I’m trying to remember the brand, “Three Star” in French I think.

    • #356189
      jbnw
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    • #356191
      jbnw
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      • Total Posts: 2,360

      @hasslecat @sffh Aluminum is too stiff for me, but never had the budget to try carbon –

      • #356205
        So Far From Heaven
        Keymaster
        • Total Posts: 6,930

        flexes like there is no tomorrow. Didn’t even dream carbon back then.

        Tubes are thin in the center and thick at the outer ends. Provided tons of strength and flex at the same time @jbnw

    • #356210
      Pam2
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      • Total Posts: 6,237

      @jbnw

      ..isn’t my topic. Maybe I should ask a sports question tomorrow on my day. 😈

    • #356230
      jbnw
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      • Total Posts: 2,360

      Well – on most sports topics, I am clueless, so I am looking forward to tomorrow!


      @pam2

    • #356252
      HassleCat
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 4,341

      It’s more like a holy calling. Sure, there are the pro racers who compete in the Tour de France and all that, and we admire them, but there are millions of us who just marvel at the magic of a machine that has no motor or engine, but allows us to propel ourselves across the surface of this planet almost ten times more efficiently than by walking. Other than some BO and a few farts, there is no pollution. And it’s quiet. In an age of noise, pollution and waste, bicycle travel is an act of defiance. Sure, it sucks when the weather is too hot or too cold, when the wind blows too hard, when the rain comes down in buckets, when all the roads seem to tilt uphill. But there are times when everything is just right, and you get into the zone, and there is just the steady hiss of the tires on the road, and you go thirty miles without any perceived effort. And it doesn’t matter if you’re too old, or too fat, or too whatever. It still happens. Not as often as 30 years ago, but it still happens.


      @pam2

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