U of Pittsburgh scientists believe they found potential coronavirus vaccine

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  • #297174

    NJCher
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    @njcher

     

    Could be rolled out quickly

    Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine believe that they’ve found a potential vaccine for the new coronavirus.

    The researchers announced their findings Thursday and believe the vaccine could be rolled out quickly enough to “significantly impact the spread of disease,” according to their study published in EBioMedicine.

    The vaccine would be delivered on a small, fingertip-sized patch. When tested on mice, the vaccine produced enough antibodies believed to successfully counteract the virus.

    The scientists say they were able to act fast because they had already done research on the similar coronaviruses SARS and MERS.

    More at link.

  • #297176

    NJCher
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    @njcher

    snip

    Some people worry that vaccine development will be ineffective due to the ability of viruses to mutate, creating an ever-moving target that prevents scientists from reliably preventing disease. For example, different strains of the flu often mutate at rapid rates, causing flu vaccines to be rendered ineffective or only partially effective as the flu season progresses.

    Luckily this does not appear to be the case for SARS-CoV-2. While the virus does mutate, it does so at a slow enough rate that scientists are optimistic that a vaccine will be effective at protecting the population. While SARS-CoV-2 has already mutated a few times throughout this pandemic, the changes appear to be minor and unlikely to cause any difference in vaccine response. Part of the reason for this slow mutation rate is that the virus carries its genetic material in one genomic strand, whereas the flu stores its code in eight segments. If different strains of the flu enter the same cell, this allows for more likely swapping of genetic material and the creation of a novel strain, but this method of change appears to play a less important factor for SARS-CoV-2.

    snip

    Link to more.

  • #297178

    NJCher
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    @njcher
  • #297180

    HubHeaver
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    @hubheaver

    Thanks! @njcher .  Some good news on the disease front.

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  • #297182

    NJCher
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    @njcher

    Here’s a description from Advanced Science News of what the patch would be like:

    snip

    The microneedle array developed by the Pittsburgh team comprises about 400 tiny needles on a small patch attached to a Band Aid. These needles deliver the COVID-19 spike protein pieces into the skin, and after time these microneedles dissolve away.

    “We developed this to build on the original scratch method used to deliver the smallpox vaccine to the skin, but as a high-tech version that is more efficient and reproducible patient to patient,” said Louis Falo, the other co-senior author, in the same press release. “And it’s actually pretty painless — it feels kind of like Velcro.”

    https://www.advancedsciencenews.com/vaccine-candidate-against-covid-19-shows-early-promise/

  • #297194

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    @enthusiast

    This is some wonderful news.

    I would like to remind you that U.S. health insurance companies do not contribute anything to health care. They are only a PARASITIC middle man receiving an undeserved cut of "FREE MONEY".

    Me

  • #297314

    NJCher
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    @njcher

    I fixed the link in my OP.

    Please note that even though it’s NY Post, if you do a Google news search, you will find a wide variety of sources covering it, including CBS News and the usual.

    However, I noted it wasn’t covered on Today Show this a.m. One would think this is big news, but all they wanted to talk about was masks.

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