Home Main Forums General Discussion What to do about Equifax breach

  • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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    What to do about Equifax breach

    For what it’s worth, you can go to Equifax and find out your status without signing anything.  I believe the NY Att Gen straightened that out with Equifax.  However, if you want their free service (for protection, LOL) then you do sign away some rights.   I have heard that the info you get when you ask Equifax about whether you are part of the breach, isn’t consistent, meaning if you ask twice you might get two different answers.  I wouldn’t put any stock in whatever they say.

    I think you can put a freeze on so no one can open new accounts but I need more information about that.

    Monitor credit cards or if you are really worried cancel and open new accounts. If you do this, remember to unfreeze if you did it per above.

    Be wary of all emails re. this matter.  Don’t click links w/o checking them out first.

    Strengthen passwords to financial institutions.

    I hope others add to this or correct me if I am wrong.

    Zentrum, 20score, Ohio Barbarian and 22 others99thMonkey, leftcoastmountains, snot, cui bono, hopemountain, shanti, virgdem, Utopian Leftist, Shanndi, twenty, incognito, nevereVereven, Major Hogwash, Cleita, Enthusiast, Paper Roses, Mom Cat, Flying Squirrel, Marym625, glinda, Land of Enchantment, TRex like this
    aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.

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    • TRex (2593 posts)
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      1. Complain to our local representatives about mega-corporations

      and the threat they are against national security. This breach is a threat to the entire country. And what is the first thing Congress and Equifax worry about? The shareholders.

      Until that kind of shit changes, we must be the bullhorn in the china shop.

      We can thank the rich for one thing - times are changing due to the silent depression in the working class. I don't think the rich will be happy with the changes, but they forced it upon themselves through greed and avarice.
    • A little weird (529 posts)
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      2. About checking your status…

      You might want to check out this article:

      https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/08/psa-no-matter-what-you-write-equifax-may-tell-you-youve-been-impacted-by-the-hack/

      Here’s an excerpt:

      Others have tweeted they received different answers after entering the same information.

      The assignment seems random. But, nevertheless, they were still asked to continue enrolling in TrustID.

      What this means is not only are none of the last names tied to your Social Security number, but there’s no way to tell if you were really impacted.

      • Bubzer (152 posts)
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        23. I've heard that the TrustID thing is designed to get people to sign up…

        … and that doing so relinquishes all rights to sue Equifax.

    • Marym625 (24885 posts)
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      3. I put this on The Daily Radical

      I’m not sure that what you’re saying about the NY Atty General is correct. Might be. But last I read, the info from Equifax is not necessarily correct and that by just clicking through to get the info, you’re waiving your rights.

      I will be happy to find out I’m incorrect.

      They need to fix all this and we shouldn’t have to lift a finger

      "Once the decision was made to go into Iraq as an invader and occupier,  it’s like our nation lost its conscience. And it has not yet gotten that conscience back." Madfloridian  
      • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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        5. I saw it and will try to find it.

        on edit:  I went to Equifax and got my status and didn’t have to sign or agree to anything.  I will still look for the article.

        aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.
        • Marym625 (24885 posts)
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          11. Cool. Thank you

          "Once the decision was made to go into Iraq as an invader and occupier,  it’s like our nation lost its conscience. And it has not yet gotten that conscience back." Madfloridian  
      • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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        6. Here is some thing I found. Don't guarantee it's accurate.

        The following IMO doesn’t apply to just finding out your status only if you want to sign up for TrustedID.

        “You could be giving up some of your rights to sue. At first, Equifax said anyone who gets the credit monitoring service, TrustedID, must agree to submit any complaints about it to arbitration. Those people wouldn’t be allowed to sue, join a class-action suit, or benefit from any class-action settlement.

        After public pressure, Equifax added an opt-out provision on Friday. Customers can get out of the arbitration requirement by notifying Equifax in writing within 30 days of accepting the monitoring service.

        And Alex Southwell, a privacy lawyer at Gibson Dunn and a former federal prosecutor in New York, said the original rules still left room for people to sue Equifax over the original hack, even if they can’t sue over the credit monitoring.”                                                                     http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/08/technology/equifax-monitoring-services/index.html

        I want to add that I have zero confidence in what they tell you your status is anyway.  So IMO do what you need to do assuming you were included.

         

        aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.
        • Marym625 (24885 posts)
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          12. Thank you

          I agree. I don’t trust them either

          "Once the decision was made to go into Iraq as an invader and occupier,  it’s like our nation lost its conscience. And it has not yet gotten that conscience back." Madfloridian  
    • PADemD (1092 posts)
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      4. I received a written notice, dated September 4,

      from Trans Union of an Equifax alert, dated July 1.  I have to call TU Customer Service.

    • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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      7. Need a lawyer but I think to gain anything from a suite you'd have

      to prove that it was this breach that did you harm.  I think that’d be very difficult.

      aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.
    • Cleita (2434 posts)
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      8. Sigh! I just wonder in hindsight what Bernie, who rightfully should have been

      our President if the hive queen hadn’t cheated, would have done with these people. I know things would have been efficiently dealt with if Bernie was in charge.

      • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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        10. There is no way that the Powers That Rule would have let Bernie become

        president as we saw.

        aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.
    • AlreadyInUse (1560 posts)
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      9. The infuriating thing about this and other data breaches

      Is that the onus is placed squarely on the victims to address the fallout. I realize that the way our system is structured may be to blame for this, but it seems like an auto manufacturer posting repair instructions and tool sources instead of issuing a recall and taking care of the problem.

    • jeff47 (916 posts)
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      13. Equifax's site doesn't actually work. Do a credit freeze

      https://yro.slashdot.org/story/17/09/10/0128214/techcrunch-equifax-hack-checking-web-site-is-returning-random-results

      Long story short, the site is returning random results.  Check at one time and you’re not in the hack, check another time and you are.  Also “Test” with a social security number 123456 was hacked, indicating the site is not actually backed by anything sane.

      If you are worried about your information being used to open accounts, you can order a credit freeze.  The three credit reporting agencies will respond to all credit report requests by saying your credit is frozen.  If you actually need to apply for a loan, you will need to remove the freeze on whichever bureau your lender is using.  You can tell them to take it off for a limited period of time, so that you don’t have to re-apply it.

      Alternatively, you can monitor your credit and report errors, so the banks are left paying for this shitty system.

      • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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        17. In this day of derivatives where company execs can bet that their company

        will fail and then become richer when it does, it wouldn’t surprise me that this whole thing is a ruse.

        aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.
    • HassleCat (1231 posts)
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      14. Very good advice.

      DO NOT respond to any email, text, voice message, tweet, regular mail, passenger pigeon, psychic brainwaves, or anything else. The scammers and phishers will be out in droves.

    • Shanndi (6 posts)
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      15. Is there any way/anyone who can push for a 'Control of your data' bill?

      Preferably across all databases?  Like a central clearinghouse or something, maybe?

       

      Seems to me most people have little idea how much of their stuff is out there, unregulated, uncared for, and unguarded.  That should be criminal.  YOUR data is yours, imo, and we need people who believe the same.

      "We all come from the Goddess and to her we shall return like a drop of rain flowing to the ocean" - Mother of Darkness, Circle of Women https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN0D2kkkLhg
    • Utopian Leftist (271 posts)
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      16. Maybe it's time to completely do away with our credit rating system,

      relieve all debt, all over the world and start over. WHO would that really damage, other than a handful of billionaires?

      I know, I’m being more “utopian” than realistic. Realistically though, we could hold Equifax legally accountable for criminal negligence, try the sumbitch corporation and perhaps hang it for treason!

       

       

      The beatdown Hillary was handed had nothing to do with Bernie Bros, Russia, a VRWC, Comey, the FBI, the media, sexism, racism or any other ism you can think of. It was a referendum on neoliberalism. It is your legacy, Obama. It’s Clinton fatigue born of endless scandals. It’s war and prison for profit. It’s criminality that dresses itself up like saintliness and looks down its nose at its victims. ~ farleftlib
      • Ohio Barbarian (4220 posts)
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        19. ^^This!^^

        Personally, I think credit bureaus should be banned outright and their assets seized.

        Ignorance is the foundation of tyranny.   
    • NJCher (2062 posts)
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      18. I did my due diligence this a.m.

      and posted about my experience.

      https://jackpineradicals.com/boards/topic/my-experience-protecting-myself-from-equifax-security-disaster/#post-768262


      Cher

       

      • Ohio Barbarian (4220 posts)
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        20. How do you "freeze" your credit?

        Seriously. I really don’t know.

        Ignorance is the foundation of tyranny.   
        • NJCher (2062 posts)
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          22. freezing your credit means

          no one can access what credit reporting companies have on you. With the information from Equifax or the other two, a thief can see where you have credit and open new lines. One of the first things they’ll do is try to get into your credit info so they can do this.

          You might need to let someone access your reports if you are making some large purchases, a remodel, a new home, a car, whatever. In this case, you can get the freeze lifted for a pre-determined amount of time. This is where the $5 comes in. The credit reporting company may or may not charge you, depending on whether you are a victim of identity theft.

          Personally, I wouldn’t care about the $5. The amount of time it takes to straighten out these messes is so high that $5 is nuthin’.

           


          Cher

    • bpilgrim (282 posts)
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      21. lock up the execs…

      …put the onus on them to protect us, not allow them to earn more money from their mistakes while requiring us to take action and provide them, even more, data on us (that may also force us to give up our rights).

      this is another example of how corporate America has all the power while we the people have none.

      if the system wasn’t rigged they would be hauled in front of a jury, and forced to make everyone whole (provide lifetime protection as a cost of being trusted with public information again).

    • xloadiex (320 posts)
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      24. I was watching

      The financial advisor, Terry Savage, this morning on the news and she advises NOT to sign up with their credit monitoring especially with their lawsuit stipulations. She said if you must, put a freeze on your credit with all 3 reporting agencies. She did say that can be a real pain.

      It appears the lawsuits are already piling up.

      https://www.reuters.com/article/us-equifax-cyber-lawsuits/lawsuits-against-equifax-pile-up-after-massive-data-breach-idUSKCN1BM2E3

      • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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        25. Sadly most class action law suits are scams. The lawyers will contact Equifax

        and Equifax will settle for 10 million dollars of which the lawyers will take 4 million.  The rest will be distributed to those that can prove that they lost money which will be very hard.  Equifax will get off for paying 4 – 5 million.

        aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.
    • NJCher (2062 posts)
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      26. link to program

      There was a program about this on today’s public radio in the NY area. It was a pretty good program and I learned a few things. The most valuable was the first-hand information from the callers, who report fraud already taking place. There were around three, if I remember correctly.  Here’s the link:

       

      https://jackpineradicals.com/boards/topic/on-at-10-1030-a-m-program-examining-equifax-security-hack/#post-769279

      Later they will have the audio up (any maybe a transcript), so check the link cited at this thread this afternoon, maybe around 3 p.m. EST.

      Cher

      • ThomPaine (3966 posts)
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        27. Thank you.

        aka rhett o rick.     The rich treat us like ants. They may avoid stepping on us, but if our home is in the way of their new swimming pool, we can kiss our ants goodbye.