Where are the monuments to Confederate Gen. James Longstreet?

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    • #336224
      Ohio Barbarian
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      I came across a surprisingly good article from CNN that was published three years ago, but is perhaps even more timely now. There are dozens of statues of Robert E. Lee and Nathan Bedford Forrest, and plenty of other Confederate generals from Stonewall Jackson to Braxton Bragg.

      There are only two of James Longstreet, one in Georgia in the town he retired to and died in, and the other at the Gettysburg National Battlefield Park in Pennsylvania, and that one was funded by Civil War re-enactment types in the 1990s as a history lesson. Longstreet was Lee’s second-in-command at the end of the Civil War, and his strategy and tactics were praised by both his Northern and Southern contemporaries and by modern military historians.

      So why does Longstreet get the Southern statue shaft? Easy. He supported Reconstruction and civil rights for freed slaves after the war. He even trained and led Black troops in running street battles against the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacists. He endorsed his old friend Ulysses S. Grant for President, and wrote about how Robert E. Lee screwed the pooch at Gettysburg.

      Here’s the CNN piece:

      So where are Longstreet’s statues?

      General James Longstreet was an important figure in the Confederate Army; as important as Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, J.E.B. Stuart or A.P. Hill; nearly as critical to the Confederate cause as Robert E. Lee.
      A genius at combining offensive and defensive maneuvers, Longstreet led his 28,000 men in a flanking movement — described as the largest simultaneous mass assault of the war — and routed the Union Army at the Second Battle of Bull Run in 1862. The carnage that Longstreet’s stout defense inflicted on attacking Union troops during the Battle of Fredericksburg a month later was so great that Lee, watching it, observed, “It is well that war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it.” Longstreet’s defeat of the northern troops during the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863 provided the Confederacy with its only major victory after Lee’s defeat at Gettysburg.
      (skip)
      Yet outside of a roadside sign near his birthplace in Edgefield, South Carolina, one statue in Gainesville, Georgia, where he died, and his name on a few streets in a handful of Southern towns, there are virtually no memorials to Longstreet throughout the South — or the entire country, for that matter. (link to full article)
      As Robert Louis Gates of Beer Summit fame says on Finding Your Roots, human beings, and history, is complicated. One of my favorite Longstreet stories is about when a British military observer in 1863 told him “I earnestly hope your people and mine will become allies.” Longstreet replied, “Your government will never support a Confederacy that practices slavery. We should have freed the slaves first, then fired on Fort Sumter.”
      Longstreet grew up on a plantation that undoubtedly had slaves, and though it appears he really thought the “peculiar institution” had to go some day, his loyalty to his home state came first. This was very common at that time. Even our language was different. The United States was always referred to in the plural, as a union of largely sovereign states. People said “These United States,” seldom “The United States,” and tended to call themselves Ohioans or South Carolinians first and Americans second.
      That’s just how they, and Longstreet, thought then. It is to his credit that he literally put his life on the line to fight for the freedom of those he previously fought to keep enslaved.
      More importantly, the story of James Longstreet proves beyond a reasonable doubt that all those Confederate statues that were erected in the Jim Crow era had absolutely nothing to do with preserving history, and everything to do with reminding both blacks and whites who was in charge and what the latter really believed in. They couldn’t use James Longstreet, perhaps the best of the Confederate generals, for that purpose.
      Old James just didn’t fit the narrative.

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

    • #336231
      Two way street
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      Statues began to be erected around 1920 when Peonage was going strong to bond blacks and the poor over to such things like Andrew Carnegie’s iron mines in the southern Appellations.  These fellow Americans just simply disappeared, never to be heard from or seen again.  It took President FDR to stop Peonage. Chain gangs still existed for decades, especially in the South where law enforcement could get away with arresting people on suspension.  (You look suspicious.)  And now we have, under my understanding, continuing Peonage under Joe Biden’s incarceration laws.

      Longstreet was pushed out of history and remembrance so the Southern way of life, peonage, bigotry and hate, could be revive.  Keep in mind the hate for women too.  In 1920, women achieved the vote.

      2020 Campaign Season: We the People are in the fight for our lives and livelihoods.

    • #336272
      ArtfromArk
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      which by that time were controlled by John D. Rockefeller. Carnegie sold out his iron and steel holdings in 1901 to J.P. Morgan, and died in 1919.

    • #336313
      Ohio Barbarian
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      @artfromark

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

    • #336321
      ArtfromArk
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      <h2 class=”user-nicename”>@ohiobarbarian</h2>

    • #336329
      Ohio Barbarian
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      @artfromark My apologies. It’s exceedingly difficult to determine who is talking to whom sometimes.

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

    • #336336
      Fasttense
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      The filthy rich in the South paid a lot of money for their slaves, large farms and propaganda. They did not want to give them up. To hell with what is right and true and honest. It was all about keeping people in concentration camp conditions…and having sex with them on the side.

      A handful of filthy rich men wanted to continue to make gobs and gobs of even more riches and have sex slaves. That’s what the losing Confederacy went to war over, nothing honorable, nothing noble.

      The poor in the South (there really wasn’t much of a middle class) lost the value of their labor merely by being born into a slave society. Would you hire a carpenter when you can teach one of your slaves to do it for free? Or you can rent a slave to do it for you….if you have any wealth.

      And consider the white wives and daughters of the slave owner. They got to marry men with all the sex slaves they wanted at their disposal.

      The poor whites were very carfully spoon fed lies like white supremacy and racism in order to keep them in check, keep them quiet about the injustice of it all.

      And they are still buying into the lies today.

    • #336397
      Ohio Barbarian
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      @fasttense No mention of what Longstreet did after the war, nothing to indicate you understood the point of my OP. Just black-and-white, good-and-evil, Manichean dualistic denunciation.

      Pure iconoclasm. Oliver Cromwell would have thought highly of you.

      It is better to vote for what you want and not get it than to vote for what you don't want and get it.--Eugene Debs

      Show me a man that gets rich by being a politician, and I'll show you a crook.--Harry Truman

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