Who Died for your Dinner?

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    • #334086
      Cold Mountain Trail
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      • Total Posts: 8,806

      A BuzzFeed News investigation reveals the extent to which…the nation’s inadequate response to (coronavirus)…has infected, sickened, and even killed workers up and down the nation’s food supply chains as they work to keep our refrigerators full…  Take a typical summer feast: tangy ribs, a side of creamy pasta salad, and a slice of freshly baked apple pie. If you shop at a Walmart Supercenter, in, say, Massachusetts, the apples you’d buy would have been picked by workers in Washington state’s Yakima Valley, who live in a crowded labor camp with few protections in place. The fruit would then be sorted into boxes in an Allan Bros. packhouse, which for weeks failed to follow federal COVID-19 safety guidelines — even after employees started falling ill.

      The ribs would have been sliced and packed by employees at a pork processing plant — like the Tyson Foods facility in Indiana that stayed open for weeks, even as the virus spread through its staff.  The pasta would have been stacked by grocery clerks whose employer was slow to close down for a deep cleaning after workers got sick, and to inform the local health department and customers of the growing outbreak.

      From those three workplaces alone — the Allan Bros. packhouse in Yakima Valley, the Tyson plant in Indiana, and the Walmart in Massachusetts — around 1,100 employees have tested positive for COVID-19, and at least four have died, according to a BuzzFeed News investigation based on government documents, company memos, and interviews with around 50 workers, managers, local officials, and labor advocates…

      Worried about putting themselves and restaurant staffers at risk, many Americans have turned to home cooking as a safer, more ethical option. But what may seem safer for consumers can still be deadly for the low-paid, often immigrant workers who make up America’s sprawling food supply chains. Across the country, from fields to packhouses to slaughterhouses to grocery stores, companies failed to require masks, build protective barriers, or arrange testing until after outbreaks had spread through the workforce. Some workers in the chain still do not get sick pay, forcing them to choose between spreading the virus or missing out on paychecks… around 29,000 workers at grocery stores, meatpacking plants, and other food processing facilities have been infected nationwide, and at least 225 have died, according to the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union. This is almost certainly an undercount…

      https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/albertsamaha/july-4th-barbecue-food-coronavirus?bfsource=relatedmanual

    • #334088
      Voltairine
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      • Total Posts: 1,797

      Who died for my dinner? The animals and plants whose body I’m eating.

      Aloha!

    • #334090
      bazukhov
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      • Total Posts: 2,685

      True Patriots who won’t make it into Trump’s Bigly Garden of Heroes.

      Tell me, great captain, how do the angels sleep when the devil leaves his porch light on? Tom Waites

    • #334111
      peacecorps
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      • Total Posts: 2,040

      Does it matter? I think not.

      They are called 'human' rights not "if politicians do not feel threatened" rights. Many politicians see national sovereignty/security as more important because they protect their power and wealth. Human rights often do just the opposite.

      National issues (slavery/racism, income inequality, pandemics and pathetic health care, weak unions) are not solved with more states' rights. Global problems (climate change, migration, trade, war, pandemics) are not resolved with more national sovereignty.

    • #334132
      Cold Mountain Trail
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      • Total Posts: 8,806

      I understood the article’s meaning re migrant labor to be that migrants/undocumented had even LESS protection or help than the american-born underclass, not that migrants were ultimately unimportant, @peacecorps

    • #334195
      Voltairine
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      • Total Posts: 1,797

      I give thanks for all the lives given so that I can eat. I’m sorry for all the lives taken so I can eat.

      The uncountable lives. Yes I live as part of the Babylon, like most of us. Do you think it’s only the virus that takes lives in the chain so that you can eat, too? Maybe it’s a good meditation to look at every thing in your fridge, etc., and to follow up the production chain of each of them and think how many lives were given making that product? How much oil was used to make and deliver them? How many lives taken, how much suffering caused so that you can buy cheap food with dollars? How many lives taken in all the struggles where capitalism takes land for capitalist production, how many lives of people working in the fields, how many refugee lives lost when they are looking for livelihood after their land is taken from them?

      I respect your feelings and compassion for those who continue to do the essential tasks so that we may continue to eat under virus threat. Maybe you can respect with your gratitude and apology also all the countless other lives? Not just American lives, or even just human lives. All lives that matter in the whole world. All lives given, all lives taken so that we can eat. All lives, including your and mine.

      Maybe we can take this virus and lockdown also as a kind of blessing. To become better conscious about our foundations of life. Maybe becoming better conscious we could find ways to eat that cause less suffering.

      Aloha!

    • #334197
      Cold Mountain Trail
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      • Total Posts: 8,806
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