Why is this The Big Story?

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    • #445751
      HassleCat
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 7,452

      A cute r22 year old woman goes on a road trip with her boyfriend and disappears. It looks like the boyfriend killed her and hid her body. OK, sensational, yes, but this sort of thing happens all the time. Seriously. What makes this one so special? Yes, the mainstream media like to distract us from the fact they are unable and afraid to give us honest news, but why this one? Is it so much like reality TV that they know we’ll eat it up?

      New details involving disappearance of Gabby Petito (msn.com)

    • #445753
      Pam2
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 9,043

      I wondered that too. I saw it on Inside Edition- ok, that’s right up their alley, but it was also on my local newscast and she is not from my state.

       

    • #445763
      NV Wino
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 8,141

      She’s blonde? Caucasian? Young? Cute?

      “As we act, let us not become the evil that we deplore.” Barbara Lee
      “Politicians and pro athletes: The only people who still get paid when they lose.” William Rivers Pitt

    • #446251
      Jan Boehmerman
      Moderator
      • Total Posts: 4,495

      Missing white woman syndrome is a term used by social scientists[1][2][3] and media commentators to refer to extensive media coverage, especially in television,[4] of missing person cases involving young, often conventionally attractivewhiteupper-middle-class women or girls. The term is used to describe the higher coverage of white women and girls in the upper-middle-class who disappear, compared to coverage of missing women that are not white, women of lower social classes and missing men or boys.[5][6] Although the term was coined in the context of missing person cases, it is sometimes used of coverage of other violent crimes. Instances have been cited in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and South Africa.[7]

      PBS news anchor Gwen Ifill is said to be the originator of the phrase.[6] Charlton McIlwain defined the syndrome as “white women occupying a privileged role as violent crime victims in news media reporting”, and concludes that missing white woman syndrome functions as a type of racial hierarchy in the cultural imagery of the West.[8] Eduardo Bonilla-Silva categorized the racial component of missing white woman syndrome as a “form of racial grammar, through which white supremacy is normalized by implicit or even invisible standards”.[1]

      Missing white woman syndrome has led to a number of tough on crime measures, mainly on the right, that were named for white women who disappeared and were subsequently found harmed.[9][10] In addition to race and class, factors such as supposed attractiveness, body size and youthfulness function as unfair criteria in the determination of newsworthiness in coverage of missing women.[11] News coverage of missing black women were more likely to focus on the victim’s problems, such as abusive boyfriends or a troubled past, while coverage of white women often tend to focus on their roles as mothers or daughters.[12]

      Article here: Missing white woman syndrome – Wikipedia

    • #446264
      Pam2
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      • Total Posts: 9,043
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