Zelensky thanks Joey for Soviet tanks

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    • #497178
      jbnw
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      • Total Posts: 9,583

      We are sincerely grateful to πŸ‡³πŸ‡±, πŸ‡ΊπŸ‡Έ and πŸ‡¨πŸ‡Ώ for providing significant and much-needed support – 90 T-72 tanks. The Armed Forces of Ukraine are pushing forward and need this equipment. We value the help of partners. Together we stand for protection of freedom & democracy!

      https://
      twitter.com/ZelenskyyUa/status/1588824242321494017

    • #497179
      jbnw
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 9,583

      Apparently the latest $400 million includes funds approved by Joey to purchase, refurbish and then give to Zelensky.

    • #497180
      jbnw
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 9,583

      Destroyed Ukrainian T-72 in the Kherson region

      https://t.me/intelslava/40053

    • #497190
      mrdmk
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 4,408

      According to sources, Ukraine is losing about 5 tanks in a day, maybe, more or less

      So 90 tanks divided by 5 losses a day equals 18 days, more or less

      So Big Joey gave Little Zen just under 3 weeks of tanks, more or less

      More or less, how am I doing?

      Also wondering out loud, do these tanks come with a full tank of gas, more or less?

      If you cannot dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit WC Fields

      Warning DO NOT CLICK HERE!
      • #497193
        jbnw
        Participant
        • Total Posts: 9,583

        From the Russian Ministry of Defense:

        In total, 331 airplanes and 169 helicopters, 2,435 unmanned aerial vehicles, 386 air defence missile systems, 6,335 tanks and other armoured fighting vehicles, 882 combat vehicles equipped with MLRS, 3,554 field artillery cannons and mortars, as well as 7,048 units of special military hardware have been destroyed during the special military operation.

        https://t.me/mod_russia_en/4876

        That’s today’s briefing, so at 230 days or so that’s around 27.5 tanks etc. a day – so maybe 3 or 4 days.

        It makes me wonder what Ukraine will look like when we get to return, though so far Dnepropetrovsk has been less directly involved. So far – it could all change tomorrow.

      • #497194
        jbnw
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        • Total Posts: 9,583

        There aren’t that many with international crossings, so I wonder when they will be destroyed – then no ammo, hardware, oil, gas and more.

        There’s a railway map to see at https://reliefweb.int/map/ukraine/ukraine-complex-map-railways-ukraine-5-mar-2022 .

        • #497199
          mrdmk
          Participant
          • Total Posts: 4,408

          In the last 3 weeks, Russia had been taking out the 330Kv substations throughout Ukraine. Since it was Russia who built the Electrical Grid in Ukraine, the only supplier for replacement parts is Russia. Replacement parts quickly ran out. Thus, Ukraine had sever power disruptions, including blackouts throughout the country. The 750Kv system was not touched. The reason for this is that Ukraine’s 3 remaining nuclear power plants needed the 750Kv power system, so they do not into emergency mode. All nuclear power plants an outside power source to run.

          The electric train system runs on both 330Kv and 750Kv, so many of the trains came to a halt after the Russian assault. Getting war supplies across the country became difficult, but at the same time a priory. So the Ukrainians made sure to power up the railroads any way they could as they needed them.

          At this time, I am more than certain, the electrical grid in Ukraine is now put back together with bailing wire, duct tape and bubble gum. Nobody in the world can help the Ukrainians with this problem, except the Russians.

          Before the attack on 330Kv power system, Russia was from time-to-time taking out the railroad substations. Within a day or two, the Ukrainians had the railroad back up and running. At the same time, from time-to-time the Russians would nail a train with transporting troops (especially foreign troops). Since the Ukrainians would use civilians as cover, trains would be dual use for military and civilians at the same time. The Russians would do their upmost to limit civilian casualties, thus attacks on the railroads themselves are minimal.

          If you cannot dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit WC Fields

          Warning DO NOT CLICK HERE!
          • #497201
            jbnw
            Participant
            • Total Posts: 9,583

            No air strike; just exactly as you said. The bailing wire wasn’t enough, apparently.

            I believe Ukraine is also using diesel trains where they have them available —

            But I wonder about the tracks – they can be destroyed in appropriate places when there are no trains – I believe that was done once on the Polish border, though I only heard of it once.

            And, of course, there’s no real way to know – we’re not there, and real information is getting harder and harder to come by. We have contacts in Ukraine, but it’s really a very tiny sample at one point in time – when the Internet is working.

      • #497196
        Joe Shlabotnik
        Participant
        • Total Posts: 1,604

        but for the last month its mostly been positional fighting, with the exception of Bakhmut, and even that’s a slow, methodical and cautious advance. By the time the Russians begin a major offensive, I don’t there will be much Ukrainian armour left.

        ~ All good things are Wild and Free ~

        • #497202
          jbnw
          Participant
          • Total Posts: 9,583

          based on fuzzy math from even fuzzier information.

          Somehow I’d forgotten about Kharkiv’s tank graveyard; here’s a picture, and I’ll create a post from it.

    • #497242
      chknltl
      Participant
      • Total Posts: 1,843

      I trained in the Army as both an M-60 and Sheridan turret mechanic.

      That was in 1973….

      I have no doubt that our (then) M-60 main battle tank was more than a match for those older Soviet T-72s.

      While the Sheridan was a much lighter scout tank, if it spotted and chose to do so, it could easily knock out a T-72 in a gunfight.

      Personally, I would still feel safer in a Sheridan than in one of those T-72s.

      OTOH, I would not feel very safe in one of our old M-60 or a Sheridan going up against a much more modern Russian T-90.

       

       

      • #497247
        jbnw
        Participant
        • Total Posts: 9,583

        Facts from experience are great to have.

        You’re right, of course – there should be a big difference between an old tank and a new model.

        • #497303
          chknltl
          Participant
          • Total Posts: 1,843

          I saw somewhere that Russia has some of their old T-72s which are upgraded but even so, an upgraded T-72 would be no match for a T-90.

          We did not have Abrams tanks when I was in the Army.

          The M-60 A1 was our main battle tank back then.

          I can not even imagine being in an M-60 A1 going up against an Abrams!

          Unless the M-60 A1 got the drop on the Abrams any gunbattle between the two would be suicide for the M-60 A1 crew!

          Putting things in perspective, Russian T-90 tanks could be likened to our Abrams while those old T-72s were not even as good as our old non-upgraded M-60s.

          There is no way in hell you could get me into a T-72 knowing I was going up against forces who could field today’s modern main battle tanks!

           

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