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Virginia State House and Senate Votes to Legalize Marijuana Starting in 2024

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    • #401358
      JonLP
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      Virginia’s state Senate and House of Delegates approved marijuana legalization bills on Friday, paving the way for the statewide legal consumption of marijuana.

      Virginia Governor Ralph Northam’s signature is required before the bill becomes law. If Northam signs, marijuana would be legal for individuals 21 years old and older to consume on a recreational basis. Virginia would become the 16th state to legalize marijuana.

      Introduced by Virginia Senator Adam Ebbin, the Senate bill would eliminate criminal penalties for simple possession and automatically expunge certain marijuana-related criminal charges from some individuals’ records. After some debate, the bill passed the Senate with a vote of 23-15. A similar version of the bill was passed by the House with a vote of 55-42. Lawmakers are expected to iron out the differences between the two bills before sending a final bill to Northam.

      “I think that Virginia is on a path to an equitable legalization plan for marijuana,” Ebbin said Friday, according to the Associated Press. “There have been a few bumps, but I’m hopeful that we’ll have a polished bill we can agree upon in the next few weeks.”

      https://www.newsweek.com/virginia-state-house-senate-votes-legalize-marijuana-starting-2024-1567294?amp=1&utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter&__twitter_impression=true

      Let this radicalize you rather than lead you to despair - Mariame Kaba

    • #401411
      HassleCat
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      The cops hate the idea of legalizing cannabis. They dependably and energetically lobby against legalization. Cannabis provides them with easy arrests and money and property they get to seize.

      • #401416
        djean111
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        https://fee.org/articles/how-a-young-joe-biden-became-the-architect-of-the-governments-asset-forfeiture-program/

        Biden, a young Senator from Delaware, had to do something to show that despite his “liberal” reputation, he could be just as tough on crime as his Republican colleagues. He took notice of the RICO law, and he realized that law enforcement agencies were not taking advantage of it, particularly in regards to the Drug War. He turned to the General Accounting Office and asked them to produce a study on the potential uses of RICO for drug enforcement.

        The Comprehensive Forfeiture Act fixed all of these problems. The new bill was introduced by Senator Joe Biden in 1983 and it was signed into law the next year. With this law, federal agents had nearly unlimited powers to seize assets from private citizens. Now the government only needed to find a way to let local and state police join the party.

        This came with the 1984 Comprehensive Crime Control Act. In addition to a slew of new powers for prosecutors, the burden of proof for asset seizure was lowered once again (agents had to only believe that what they were seizing was equal in value to money believed to have been purchased from drug sales). More significantly, the bill started the “equitable sharing” program that allowed local and state law enforcement to retain up to 80 percent of the assets seized.

        But the Lopeses are only one example out of millions. In the year their home was confiscated by police for a minor, four-year-old drug charge, $644 million in assets were seized. In 2018 alone, the Treasury Department’s Forfeiture Fund saw nearly $1.4 billion in deposits. The Lopes story merely illustrates that criminals (regardless of how one might feel about drug laws) are hardly the only people falling victim to this policy.

        Can’t see Biden allowing legal marijuana and depriving the police of soooo much money.

        America is not a country, it's just a business. (Brad Pitt, Killing Them Softly)

    • #402643
      B Calm
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      • #402644
        Satan
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        Many states have delayed the implentation so they can set up licensing & regulation of growers & retailers, which is not a bad thing, as it allows for consistent quality of cannabis products. But I can’t imagine that process taking more than one year at most.

        Maybe the 3 years is so the prison-industrial complex can find a new source of “recruits”, since they won’t have small time weed dealers to kick around anymore?

        "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable". - John F. Kennedy

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