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Computers and Technology

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It’s About To Get Even Easier to Hide on the Dark Web

  • CNW (2491 posts)
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    It’s About To Get Even Easier to Hide on the Dark Web

    It’s About To Get Even Easier to Hide on the Dark Web

     

    Sites on the so-called dark web, or darknet, typically operate under what seems like a privacy paradox: While anyone who knows a dark web site’s address can visit it, no one can figure out who hosts that site, or where. It hides in plain sight. But changes coming to the anonymity tools underlying the darknet promise to make a new kind of online privacy possible. Soon anyone will be able to create their own corner of the internet that’s not just anonymous and untraceable, but entirely undiscoverable without an invite.

    Over the coming months, the non-profit Tor Project will upgrade the security and privacy of the so-called “onion services,” or “hidden services,” that enable the darknet’s anonymity. While the majority of people who run the Tor Project’s software use it to browse the web anonymously, and circumvent censorship in countries like Iran and China, the group also maintains code that allows anyone to host an anonymous website or server—the basis for the darknet.

    That code is now getting a revamp, set to go live sometime later this year, designed to both strengthen its encryption and to let administrators easily create fully secret darknet sites that can only be discovered by those who know a long string of unguessable characters. And those software tweaks, says Tor Project co-founder Nick Mathewson, could not only allow tighter privacy on the darknet, but also help serve as the basis for a new generation of encryption applications.

    “Someone can create a hidden service just for you that only you would know about, and the presence of that particular hidden service would be non-discoverable,” says Mathewson, who helped to code some of the first versions of Tor in 2003. “As a building block, that would provide a much stronger basis for relatively secure and private systems than we’ve had before.”

    read more: https://www.wired.com/2017/01/get-even-easier-hide-dark-web/

     

    hypergrove, Mom Cat, Ichingcarpenter and 8 othersDesertRat2015, Downwinder, ThouArtThat, , SandersDem, Tuesday, arendt, elias39 like this

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  • SandersDem (409 posts)
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    1. If you download and use TOR please

    volunteer to run a relay.  You will be helping someone in a country whose freedom has been restricted.  That could soon be the US as well.

  • ThouArtThat (2838 posts)
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    2. This Sounds Like Good News Overall – Privacy Is Job One

    eom

    Spam Suppression - Cialis - Viagra - Levitra
  • leveymg (1824 posts)
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    3. Wouldn't it make sense for the NSA to offer this software?