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The Voice of Poverty and Disability

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Upper Class Dependence on the Poor

  • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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    Upper Class Dependence on the Poor

    This is going to be long. I am speaking about poverty as I am a poverty scholar having both lived, studied, and witnessed poverty on the ground. Why do I think poverty is an important issue in your discussion? Because the middle and upper classes do not realize how much they depend on those in poverty to maintain their own class standings. Here are some ways:

    1. Cheap labor. While in our own country and those abroad who do not make enough wage to live on, every time you visit a grocery store, a WalMart or Target store, a café worker, childcare worker, and grounds keeper, Home Depot, etc., anyone of the upper classes who patronize those services, they are dependent on these workers to keep the prices down both for the goods they buy as well as the employee whom they pay, this is so they can afford those goods and services.
    1. Charity donations: On the average when donating to a mega-non-profits who receive about $52,000-$64,000 per client ~ but only about $2,000 is actually given in direct services. Rich people who donate $millions can use these donations as their own private Cayman Islands for tax breaks. In essence, they do not make any donation at all since they get it all back. NOBODY asks where that $50,000-62,000 goes. Well, I have asked that question and found to my disgust that little is done by these mega-nons for anyone but themselves.
    1. Furthermore mega non-profits use cheap labor while their Executive Directors and their associated cohorts make 6-7 figure incomes ~ while even employing slave labor (“volunteers” who are often the working poor paying off things such as their welfare check at 50 cents an hour or community work for those getting out of jail or work requirements to pay off food stamps, and/or now Medicaid). Non-profit paid workers are also paid well below the standard of living ~ so they can benefit the charity to generate those donations that pay those Executive Directors, lawyers, accountants, and board members those 6 figure incomes.
    1. Government funding in mega-non-profits is a must since they often match grants for these entities. They usually do not give grants to smaller non-profits who are doing the REAL work on the ground. These for-profits who also take in slave labor for “training” while never having to observe labor laws such as giving breaks or observe safety issues, often forcing their slave labor to work a straight 8 hours with not so much as a lunch break.
    1. Taxes: In my state (WA) as a low-income person I pay over 17% of my income in taxes, as do most poor, who pay up to 20% of their meager income in this way.  The middle class pays about 10% in taxes out of their incomes ~ and the richest pay only 2% of their incomes in taxes. Both classes howl about how much they pay, but the truth is, they can afford to pay the 17% the poor pay, but law-makers would *never* concede this reality, instead they keep raising regressive taxes that burden the poor the most. Why does the poor pay so much? So the upper classes don’t have to. 
    1. Illegal immigrants: the employers who pay them pass their “savings” onto us, while illegal immigrants pay for things they would never receive such as paying into the Social Security and Medicare funds. You can find out how much they pay in your state here: http://www.itep.org/immigration/#map. My state receives over $315,000,000.
    1. Medical industry: Whether a mega-non or for- profit the medical industry who employ millions in the middle and upper classes, they receive massive $millions in grants and donations to maintain their businesses. These classes depend upon that money to employ themselves or profit from the takings. I also include there the psychology and psychiatry businesses in this mix who depend on $millions for their own for-profit businesses. BTW there is no scientific proof psychology or psychiatry works.
    1. The prison industries: As the U.S. has the largest prison populations in the world it should be considered how the middle and upper classes depend upon the prison industries for their own survival They keep the lower and middle class in jobs. They often use slave labor in for-profit prisons for side businesses, hard labor and other ways to profit off a convicted felon’s backs.

    Those are just a few ways those in the upper classes depend upon the poor for their own benefit. The next time anyone looks down on a beggar in the street, they might consider how they employ the middle class to give them services from these entities and how the upper classes employ a huge proportion of the middle classes for their own survival.

    It is time for the upper classes to realize their own dependence upon the poor by using punitive practices to keep the poor in check with rules, regulations, and laws. BTW if you want to see where you stand in your state as to how much of your income you pay in taxes compared to the other classes you can find that here:  http://www.itep.org/whopays/

    Just (way more than) my 2 cents, Cat in Seattle

     

    Enthusiast, Gracchus, grouchomarxist and 21 othersFanBoy, davidthegnome, iggy, hopemountain, Two way street, Dragonfli, Dragon Turtle, Doremus Jessup, bbgrunt, A little weird, Mom Cat, Tuesday, PADemD, historylovr, twenty, jwirr, ThouArtThat, HeartoftheMidwest, KarenS, vanflower, potisok like this
    Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa

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    • ThouArtThat (4095 posts)
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      1. Absolutely Correct – The 1% Are Grifters And Kleptocrats – The Sooner The 99%

      Realize this the sooner we can be liberated from the drain on our individual and collective resources.

      "In America Today, Power Corrupts and Money Corrupts Absolutely" - Anonymous  
      • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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        3. The middle class

        …especially have a hard time facing the reality they depend upon the poor, they think it was all about their “working hard” and think the poor “don’t work hard enough” or they would be middle class too. The rich don’t care, they like to chalk it all up to “smart business practices.” The poor often do not realize how much they contribute and consider themselves a burden on society, that they are tax payers themselves and often make the greatest sacrifice to pay them.

        You are right it is all about educating all classes as to how much they depend upon the poor. If each class saw this they would have to take responsibility for how they profit. IMO they are too chicken to face that ~ plus it pays off for them if they pretend the poor are a burden.

        Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
    • Entrepreneur (1755 posts)
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      2. Yes. And while the poor are berated for having cell phones or TVs while on

      government subsidies, rarely if ever do these same critics complain about large institutions taking taxpayer subsidies while paying their upper level executives multi-million dollar salaries.  It’s all a diversion. Because if it was really about delivering the most services while wasting the fewest taxpayer dollars then these institutions would be held to the same standards, such as eliminating exorbitant executive salaries or forfeiting taxpayer subsidies.

      No longer GoneFishin.  Truth is I've never GoneFishin.
      • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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        4. What you said X 1000 ^^^

        Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
    • Dragonfli (1054 posts)
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      5. Excellent Contribution, brevity matters little if length adds to clarity

      I certainly hope you will join the group and consider continuing to add any special expertise you may have. I am very experienced in matters of poverty, but my experience relies on personal experiences within a poverty ridden sub-culture, having been born in poverty, raised myself from 15 on, homeless the first three years in even deeper poverty and having never abandoned the poverty ridden neighborhood that I grew up in.

      You said you studied poverty, I am merely self educated and so may lack expertise. As long as you are not among those that live only in the world of theory (many such scholars make things worse, even with the best of intentions, for those living it) and have actual experience as one that has suffered the condition personally and thus understand exactly what I am talking about, you are very much needed here.

      Please consider taking a very active role.

      Denny

      “We must dissent from the indifference. We must dissent from the apathy. We must dissent from the fear, the hatred and the mistrust. We must dissent from a nation that has buried its head in the sand, waiting in vain for the needs of its poor, its elderly, and its sick to disappear and just blow away. We must dissent from a government that has left its young without jobs, education or hope. We must dissent from the poverty of vision and the absence of moral leadership. We must dissent because America can do better, because America has no choice but to do better.” Thurgood Marshall

        

    • FanBoy (7985 posts)
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      6. I've observed precisely the same things you have and can only say that I

      wish more people understood the game.  I had a guy singing the praises of the “non-profit charity” that runs my
      “work-half-time-for-minimum-wage” “job training” program.  He didn’t believe me when I said the charity gets all the money from the feds — he thought they somehow came up with the money themselves.  He was a bit ticked off that I contradicted his story and has pretty much ignored me since at the meetings of another non-profit volunteer org we both belong to.  He has a “real” job at yet another non-profit, which again, exists to ‘help’ those damaged by the ravages of capital.  What would all these helpers do for work if capital stopped ravaging, I wonder?

      Mine is one of the programs Trump wants to kill — for a pittance (<500 mill).   And just guessing that a chunk of that goes into salaries for the program’s “helping professionals” too.  Participants only make about 9K a year, working for yet *other* non-profits.  Which again, exist to ‘help’.

      Even figuring a minimal salary & benefits, the program supervisor must make nearly half of what is paid to all the local participants.  Which likely comes out of the <500 mill budget as well.  Plus some part of the funding for other “helpers,” like the social networker who is supposed to find open jobs we can’t find on our own, but so far has never come up with anything not already listed in public sources.

      So to your list of benefits the uppers get, I should add one the upper-middles get — somewhat prestigious and supposedly ethical/caring jobs as ‘helpers’.  Which exist only because of the growing population of ‘helped,’ which is deliberate divide and rule policy of the rulers.  And the helpers, who pride themselves on their intelligence, will for the most part never see it.  They’re invested in the problems they (fail to) help with being real, and caused by the shortcomings of participants, who obviously need their dubious help.

       

    • davidthegnome (1006 posts)
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      7. Some questions

      “Taxes: In my state (WA) as a low-income person I pay over 17% of my income in taxes, as do most poor, who pay up to 20% of their meager income in this way. The middle class pays about 10% in taxes out of their incomes ~ and the richest pay only 2% of their incomes in taxes. Both classes howl about how much they pay, but the truth is, they can afford to pay the 17% the poor pay, but law-makers would *never* concede this reality, instead they keep raising regressive taxes that burden the poor the most. Why does the poor pay so much? So the upper classes don’t have to. ”

      During my one year in college that I spent mostly broke and that ruined my credit, I took an intro to sociology class.  Now, the Professor put up a chart one day that displayed income levels for the poor, the working poor, the working middle class, the average working middle class… some of the numbers really surprised me.  As a boy, I always thought that people who made over 60 grand a year were rich.  Now I realize that they are not quite (I don’t think) even average working middle class.  When you say that the middle class pays 10% in income taxes – what sort of yearly income are we talking about?  Which middle class income group?  A quick google search shows me this:

      “The upper middle class grew to 29.4% of the population in 2014, up from 12.9% in 1979, according to a new Urban Institute report. It defines this group as having household income of between $100,000 and $350,000 for a three-person family.Jun 21, 2016”

      My parents are somewhere around the 100K portion of that, but they pay a ridiculous amount in taxes every year (according to my Father, at least).  Now, Maine’s income taxes are, I think, rather high between state and federal, but it was always my understanding (correct me if I’m wrong) that it was generally a rate of 35% or more (for the middle class) of income throughout most of the US.  I suppose it ultimately depends on the numbers, but what standards of definition are you using for middle class?

      If point 5 is accurate (and I am not saying that it isn’t, only that I’m confused) then I am actually, for the first time in a while, actually shocked once more about just how screwed the poor in this Country are.  That is, not only do we generally do most of the most labor intensive jobs, but that we are also paying the most in taxes?  I know that my tax rate isn’t terribly high… I think they take about forty or so out of my weekly checks, which usually leaves me with something like 180.  The forty bucks would help, but… it’s a tax of around 18% or so if I’m doing my math right.  Given that my wage is Maine’s new minimum (9 an hour) this would seem to support your theory.

      I have however, heard a lot of middle class people talk about how they are paying 35, or even as high as 45%.  Is it a matter of not having good accountants or not using certain tax loopholes?  How the heck is it that the poorest of us are paying 17%, the middle class 10 – and the richest 2?  What mathematician from hell came up with that shit?  I’ve always despised the tax cuts for the richest of us – and I knew things were bad – but I did not realize the extent.

      Just wow.  Apparently I have a lot of reading to do!  Thanks for the informative post!

      “There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress.” - Mark Twain
      • FanBoy (7985 posts)
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        8. here's the 2014 data for wage income only.

        median income (half below, half above) for wage earners that year = ~#28K.  Keep in mind that includes part-time as well as full-time workers — all wage income.

        and also keep in mind it doesn’t include capital income, such as people with investments have.

        Just labor income.

        https://www.ssa.gov/cgi-bin/netcomp.cgi?year=2014

         

        Top tax rate for labor income – 39.6%.

        For capital income – 20%

        http://www.schwab.com/public/schwab/nn/articles/Taxes-Whats-New

        • davidthegnome (1006 posts)
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          9. Thanks for posting that.

          I hear a lot of different things about these numbers – and I imagine a lot of it has to do with the difference between tax rate for labor income, capital income, total assets, etc.

          Cat’s numbers surprised me though.  A 17% tax on the poor, a 10% on the middle class – and a 2% on the wealthiest?  Maybe it differs a great deal by state, I really have to do some more research on this – and your links will help.  Also, weird that labor is taxed higher than capital gains.  Seems kind of the opposite of how it should be.

          I heard the other day (and I don’t know if this is Maine-wide or Nation-wide) that the average family receiving food stamps gets about 1.37 per person, per meal.  I was wondering to myself… what the hell can you buy with a buck thirty seven?  Given, as well, the restrictions on how those EBT cards can be used?  Crazy damn world we live in.  Now I learn that these same people (as most of them are working poor) tend to pay more taxes than the middle class or the rich?

          Jesus.  Are our legislators smoking crack or what?  That’s really… not sustainable.  They can say: “Let them eat cake”, but if this shit keeps up, we’ll be eating THEIR cake when the revolution begins…

          “There is no distinctly native American criminal class save Congress.” - Mark Twain
          • FanBoy (7985 posts)
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            10. I believe cat's numbers apply to her state (Washington state) specifically,

            and are in the way of hypothetical estimates, as WA doesn’t have an income tax.  (Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s how I read it).

            Typically taxes at the state level are more regressive than at the federal level — everywhere.

            • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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              11. Fanboy is right about where I live but …

              …most of the other stats I quote are correct nationally.  As I said in the article, my state has “regressive” taxes meaning that there is no income tax ~ but they compensate for this by putting taxes on virtually everything else from toilet paper to car tabs. This falls most heavily on the lowest income people because they are paying the same taxes as everybody else on things like toilet paper, license renewals, gas, phone fees, the rent they pay for housing, and just about everything else.

              A good source for the information I get comes from the website I gave for immigrant tax contributions, The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy ( http://itepnet.org/). They break down taxes state by state as well as give corporate taxes paid (if any at all) and a lot of other information. I learned about this group about 25 years ago after taking a tax fairness class through The Council of Churches. But every state I have checked through those years, even those with an employment tax, consistently the poor pay the highest percentage of their meager incomes on taxes and thus make the greatest sacrifices. If someone in the middle class making $80,000 per year pays 10% of their income in taxes, they still have $72,000 for their family to live on. If a low-income wage earner makes $20,000 a year pays 10% of their income for their family, they have about $18,000 left to live on, which in most states is below the poverty line. This is why I say the poor make the greatest sacrifices when paying taxes and taking a jolt no other class experiences, see?

              As for being a scholar, I should be clear as to why I am called one. I do *not* have any mainstream sheepskin stating that I have a degree except those I have earned from a state college in another discipline. But I proudly claim credit through the graduate program of The Poverty Initiative out of Riverside Church in NYC where I was given the status because of my more than 40 years living poverty, being an advocate for those in poverty,  and from what I know that I have witnessed for those being affected by poverty out of those many years (at least 35 years) of studying local, state and national poverty policy, laws and practices that impact those on the ground.  The Poverty Institute values the real experience and counts that towards actual college credits.

               

              Hope this helps, Love Cat

               

              Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
              • FanBoy (7985 posts)
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                12. thanks cat. i was referring to your bullet #5 specifically these numbers

                Taxes: In my state (WA) as a low-income person I pay over 17% of my income in taxes, as do most poor, who pay up to 20% of their meager income in this way.  The middle class pays about 10% in taxes out of their incomes ~ and the richest pay only 2% of their incomes in taxes

          • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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            16. SNAP actually allots > than $1.37

            They actually allot about $1.19 per person per meal a day.  For diabetics for instance, that simply is not enough as a diabetic diet has to be high in proteins and fresh vegetables. One would say the protein could include legumes that are cheap, but legumes also carry a lot of starch, a no-no for a diabetic.  Many poor live in food deserts and so “fresh” is actually akin to “used food,” they are few choices and the choices they have are usually not that fresh. Organic is out of the question at all since they are significantly more expensive than “regular” veggies.

            Many think that the obesity crisis in low income communities is because “they eat too much” and that SNAP is being too generous. N-o-o-o, this is not true. Obesity is a form of malnutrition because families have to supplement their diets with a lot of carbs such as pasta, beans, potatoes, and rice.  Anyone trying to feed a family of four with a meal costing $4.76 (including a beverage) would find that this is impossible without supplementing a sugary drink such as koolaid, few veggies (like spaghetti sauce counting as a “vegetable”) , and a little meat with LOTS of starch.  A single person using $4.76 per DAY would not find that possible and many who have tried as an experiment to live off that amount find they cannot do it.

            If there is a food bank around this is a must for those living on SNAP but they also have to meet the expectation that their clients to live off the same nutritional requirements as they either cannot get the good highly nutritional food most people need, or they never have enough and have to ration what they can supplement.

            Hope this helps …

            Love, Cat

             

            Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
      • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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        19. Sorry so late again …

        Perhaps I am telling you something you already know but, when I speak of the poor paying more taxes vs the rich I am speaking about the percentage. So, for example, a flat 10% tax is $2,000 for someone making $20,000 leaving them only $18,000 to live on. This is a far greater sacrifice than someone making $100,000 who will pay $10,000 as they will still have $90,000 to live on.

        No doubt about it tho, the middle class is getting it in the shorts. I am only speaking about federal taxes here. Then when the states come in and take more of whatever kinds of taxes, whether regressive taxes (such as taxes on goods services, phone, etc) or progressive (such as state employment taxes)  it raises taxes even more. It gets complicated. If you cannot afford an accountant who can help you navigate through the tangled mess, you are f*ked. and there is *no* way for the poor to get out of their taxes, accountant or not because most of the time they have no assets like property to claim.

        What you tell me enlightens me. If the middle class in your state is paying over 30% something is wrong IMO and this is interesting  ~ not wrong with the taxpayer but with the legislator that sets all of whatever taxes can be taken. They pay about 10-12% in my state which sounds better for them than the middle class in your state. We have tried to pass legislation to make the taxes fairer for the middle class (mostly upper middle class) and poor but never get anywhere with it. The middle class always strikes it down. No wonder the middle class in my state do not care if we stay in the regressive box and to hell with the poor!

        That gives me something to chew on. I am not sure what to do with it, but thanks for enlightening me. I encourage you to go to the ITEP site and check out what you state’s classes and corporations are paying IF corps pay anything at all. Here is the map for what state’s classes pay, just click on your state and the map will give you a whole bunch of information about your state and there is a myriad of other charts about other tax info on that site too, many that are downloadable:  http://www.itep.org/whopays/ 

        Love, Cat

        Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
    • Gracchus (1257 posts)
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      13. I would add that our large managerial class exists due to American

      business practices. In his 1996 book  Fat and Mean: The Corporate Squeeze of Working Americans and the Myth of Managerial “Downsizing” the late David M. Gordon discussed how American corporations chose to take the “low road” of management via fear and draconian discipline instead of seeking a more cooperative workplace culture to maintain and increase productivity and profits. The result is that the United States has a much larger private sector management bureaucracy than most other developed countries. This has been a major boon for middle-class and upper middle-class Americans who work in managerial and some professional roles. Of course, on the downside managers are also subject to intense discipline and surveillance in Americans firms, so you end up with a giant pyramid of management all the way to the CEOs.

      • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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        20. Good point!

        Middle management is kind of stuck in a rut as often they are the first to be laid off after selling their souls to cling to that job. Nowadays what with the diminishing union support, there is virtually no job security. Some lower management are still in unions if they have a state or federal job, but even this is iffy since (hate to say it) unions gave away a lot of their power while negotiating for higher pay, benefits, etc. I had a large fight with my old union about this but this is a story for another time. Suffice it to say they gave away the store so their president could get more money after they screwed their own members including those in middle management. Horrible and heartbreaking.

        Love, Cat

        Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
        • Gracchus (1257 posts)
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          21. Unions gave up influence and control for higher pay and benefits.

          American unions have generally followed the business union strategy of working for higher pay and benefits instead of a greater say in how the workplace is run. Back in the New Deal era this seemed like a good idea. It was the basis for the compromise between labor and management. Management would maintain control over how work was done and labor would reap the benefits of increased profits and productivity. At one time this strategy seemed like a good idea but in hindsight I think it would have been better to fight for more say in the workplace even if it meant sacrificing some pay and benefits in the short term. German unions, for example, fought for more power in the workplace, such as having a requirement that production workers be represented on company boards, and in the long run that has proven a better deal than what the American unions got. Continental European unions are now much stronger than those in Anglophone countries.

          • grouchomarxist (201 posts)
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            22. i did not know this

            that said, some of these oldtimers are wellaware of how to lay down on a bad boss

            it’s too bad the hall doesn’t get behind them.

    • mossyfrog (364 posts)
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      14. Always

      Always amazes me the terms “for profit” and “non profit”. There is no such thing as a “non-profit” . Like you state Op , These “non-profit” organizations make huge amounts of money which mainly go right back into the administration costs which pay huge incomes to the top people. Seems to me these “non-profit” organizations are make huge amounts of profit. Just look at Clinton’s and their “charitable” organization. Sure they spend a small portion of donations towards good things but that’s just a front. Mostly its their own private Cayman Islands. Tax shelters and or trust funds (sitting on a board collecting $$$ is not work or a job!)  for there family’s without having to pay taxes.

      Green-logo-300x84 Join us and be truly Revolutionary!        
      • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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        15. Sadly this is all too true, Mossyfrog

        The only difference IMO is that mega-nons do not pay taxes ~ although nowadays one may say neither does corporations. In my state where Boeing began, they have not paid a single dime in taxes, indeed they get about $1Billion back, I guess “for being so nice.”  “Nice” meaning they give j-o-o-o-b-s.   Well as quickly as they give those j-o-o-o-b-s, they lay their workers off ~ and then whine to the legislators that they should not have to pay such high unemployment insurance because well, they give us j-o-o-o-b-s. WTF?  The whole thing about mega-nons is they are little different as they too give us j-o-o-o-b-s for mostly the middle class ir, professionals like social workers, accountants, lawyers and the like.  Mega-non McJob employees well, they either work for nothing and without the mega-non even having to observe safety and labor laws, or they are left in the same boat as any other McJob worker ~ sloppy labor law observations, no support, nor any way to pay the rent. And it is even worse for a mega-non worker since nobody gives a crap about their work conditions, because any sort of criticism of all their “good work for the pooooooor” is not politicly correct.

        GAH!

        Love, Cat

        Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
        • mossyfrog (364 posts)
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          17. Too true! and + 1 zillion

          Mcjobs lol. Love that and if you don’t mind I’ll borrow it :) . Aaaand not to forget that They get Mega $ to move into a State (because ya know all those “Mcjobs they’ll bring in) Then they get taxed zilltch and then they start cutting jobs declaring they just can’t pay the workers and then they go threatening the state (who are so stupid they fall in line) so the State gives them even more or special treatment like deregulation laws or land concessions. All the while cutting pay lower and lower to the breaking point (but hey what are ya all sheeple complaining about? you at least have a job!). Its a huge scam and our “representatives” are so corrupt (and or stupid) they fall in line faster then my income lasts the 1st week of month.

          Green-logo-300x84 Join us and be truly Revolutionary!        
          • mntleo2 (107 posts)
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            18. Be My guest!

            I would be flattered for you to use that!

            Of what you describe is exactly what Boeing does to WA legislators; if they don’t give these tax deadbeats what they want, they threaten to leave and there goes our j-o-o-o-b-s ~ as if they don’t go away at their whim anyway.

            I am low income but am proud to pay my fair share in taxes, as a matter of fact, it is kinda fun to wave that in an elitist’s face and show them how the poor make the greater tax sacrifices.  But holding us hostage simply because they want to grub off our backs is taking it WAY too far and they deserve to get spanked for it!

            Love, Cat

             

            Cat in Seattle   >^..^<   "I like democracy *not* xenocracy..."  ~  Frank Zappa
    • grouchomarxist (201 posts)
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      23. so am i to conclude, then that my doc's office is receiving grant money?

      or is that just my hospital.

      i wonder if there’s a way to push back when you receive shitty healthcare service.  i spoke with a congressional aide the other day who told me that they were putting into practice a scheme to make medicare/medicaid payments dependent on results.

      the overbilling really pisses me off too.  with a doctor i like i’m happy to overlook it, but the clincher is that medicare doesn’t even fuckin care.

      i like firing doctors and do so frequently: i’d love to solve our differences a different way however.

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