• Update on weirdness

    Update on site issues: (1. replies now need a title *and* something in the message box, 2. certain links are causing strange pop-ups on Apple devices, and 3. Some folks can't type anything into the text box.) Basically, a series of unfortunate events set us back on testing. We'll get to it as soon as we can, and hopefully things can get fixed by this weekend if not before.  More info: https://jackpineradicals.com/boards/topic/site-problems-more-info/

Political Humor

Home Political Humor

Found in a White House medicine cabinet:

  • GoodWitch (956 posts)
    Profile photo of GoodWitch Donor

    Found in a White House medicine cabinet:

    Nothing but 24-karat will suffice

    HubHeaver, broiles, PennLawyer and 4 othersFasttense, daleanime, morgwynn, KarenS like this
    Make America THINK again

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

  • PennLawyer (2090 posts)
    Profile photo of PennLawyer Donor

    1. I learned it in English Lit.: "All that glitters is not gold."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_that_glitters_is_not_gold

    All that glitters is not gold is a well-known saying, meaning that not everything that looks precious or true turns out to be so. This can apply to people, places, or things that promise to be more than they really are. The expression, in various forms, originated in or before the 12th century[1] and may date back to Aesop.[2] The Latin is Non omne quod nitet aurum est.[3]

    Chaucer gave two early versions in English: “But al thyng which that shyneth as the gold / Nis nat gold, as that I have herd it told” in “The Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale”,[3] and “Hyt is not al golde that glareth” in “The House of Fame”.[4]

    The popular form of the expression is a derivative of a line in William Shakespeare’s play The Merchant of Venice, which employs the word “glisters,” a 17th-century synonym for “glitters.” The line comes from a secondary plot of the play, the puzzle of Portia’s boxes (Act II – Scene VII – Prince of Morocco):

    All that glisters is not gold—
    Often have you heard that told.
    Many a man his life hath sold
    But my outside to behold.
    Gilded tombs do worms enfold.
    Had you been as wise as bold,
    Young in limbs, in judgment old,
    Your answer had not been inscrolled
    Fare you well. Your suit is cold—
    Cold, indeed, and labor lost.

    • GoodWitch (956 posts)
      Profile photo of GoodWitch Donor

      2. Impressive!

      Thank you

      Make America THINK again
      • PennLawyer (2090 posts)
        Profile photo of PennLawyer Donor

        3. All credit goes to those researching wonks at Wikipedia.

        or, to paraphrase Isaac Newton, “I stand on the shoulders of (research) giants.”  Thanks to Wikipedia, which I consider one of the ten wonders of the modern world.

         

Share