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McMansion Hell reviews Trump's penthouse

  • arendt (1432 posts)
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    McMansion Hell reviews Trump's penthouse

    Who’s Style is That? Louis XIV or Donald Trump? An Interior Design Guide to the New President

    In the image below, I especially like “urn containing the ashes of America’s future”.

    Enthusiast, spud demon, Koko and 3 othersbroiles, 7wo7rees, jwirr like this

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13 replies
  • LiberalElite (5567 posts)
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    1. It's not unlike how Joan Rivers furnished her condo but at least

    Rivers could use self-deprecating humor at it:  “This is where Marie Antoinette would have lived if she had money.”

    I feel much better since I've given up hope
    • arendt (1432 posts)
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      4. Apropos to that, from the story…

      As Fran Lebowitz so elegantly put it, “Donald Trump is a poor person’s idea of a rich person.” It’s a pretty simple system, really: gold = rich. Columns = rich because banks have columns. Chandeliers = rich because they’re big and shiny.

  • Haikugal (6087 posts)
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    2. My Mom would've loved that…gah!!

      Be the bird.....       Hey DNC! Up Yours! It's ON!! Kick against the pricks!!!
    • arendt (1432 posts)
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      5. Like most politics today, it is really hard for satire to top reality

      Before this, I wouldn’t have believed anyone could waste that much money so tastelessly. If I didn’t know it was Trump’s pad, I would have said it is a photoshop satire.

  • hollys mom (907 posts)
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    3. I am waiting for the gold plated toilet in the white house. Trump requires gold

    to shit

    • arendt (1432 posts)
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      6. He can probably get one from the Pentagon. n/t

      • hollys mom (907 posts)
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        7. oh, you are right, thanks

  • leveymg (3464 posts)
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    8. I'd stroke out if I had to spend more than 5 minutes in the place.

    I’d rather die than be one of them.

    • arendt (1432 posts)
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      9. Dorothy Parker quote

      “If you want to know what God thinks of money, look at some of the people he gives it to”

      • leveymg (3464 posts)
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        10. Money is largely wasted on the rich, which may be one of best reasons to

        to take most of it away from them.

        Not sure who said that, but it seems true in most cases.  Even the homes of those who have better taste are somehow embarrassing:

        But that one was owned by the guy who said “If you owe the bank $100 that’s your problem. If you owe the bank $100 million, that’s the bank’s problem.”

         

        • arendt (1432 posts)
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          11. Hmmm, the Getty Villa is an interesting case

          It is a copy of the “Villa of the Papyri”, a building excavated at Herculaneum near Mt. Vesuvius in which thousands of (charred) ancient papyri were found (and recently read by exotic X-ray methods). The search for such papyri (and the statuary) were a driving force behind the Renaissance, because they gave a view of a literate, accomplished, artistic, non-theocratic society to  medieval Christian society. All that is to say, it is not just some modern folly; it is a copy of a Villa from the Roman Empire, and a villa of some importance. As such, it deserves points for historical accuracy.

          To see such a building in good maintenance, with all the plantings healthy and trimmed, and the pool filled, is an experience, albeit an embarrassing one. Much like seeing the Newport, RI “cottages” or Versailles. Such excesses did not survive the coming of democracy and the middle class, except as (often subsidized) museums.

          To be middle class and see such a museum is completely different than to be a master or a slave in a society that allows such things and to see such a villa. It displays the utter decadence of the elite Romans and their households full of slaves. These kinds of villas are a dime a dozen around Naples, which was the Riviera of the Roman Empire. We are headed back to the master/slave society; and assholes like Trump are proud to take us there. And HRC just wants to own one of her own.

          • leveymg (3464 posts)
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            12. I've been there, and to the Breakers, but not yet to Versailles. I'd add the

            Frick Mansion on Fifth Avenue near the Met, and the other Art Palaces of New York where I lazed away a great many afternoons in my youth.  Back then, Manhattan’s museums were far cheaper than the cinema.

            The 19th Century houses of the Robber Barons, in particular, are ambitious, grand, and enraging testaments to their owners’ ability to turn grueling labor  – not slavery, but the miserable conditions and long hours of employment, and miserly wages, of many workmen of that era were close – into palaces of purchased (or looted) genius.  Andrew Carnegie and his cronies attempted to justify industrial misery in those very terms, as had the Antebellum slaveholders, and the Athenians they aspired to before.

            They all claimed that without gross inequality there would be no Great Art and High Culture.  Fewer good portraits of eminent men and their wives, perhaps, but great art and culture survived into the Century of the Common Man.  Thankfully, the high inheritance and Real Estate taxes of the latter 20th Century forced the Gods to give up so much of their lucre.  That fact would not have pleased Mr. Frick, but he undoubtedly did have great taste:

             

             

            • arendt (1432 posts)
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              13. Your comment reminds me of all the unresolved issues I have about our "culture"

              I had forgotten the excuse that great money was needed to make great art. And, I do remember when museums were cheap. Now, they have deliberately priced themselves out of the market, because they don’t want to be bothered educating the public; they want to hobnob with rich donors and rent themselves out for corporate parties.

              Nevertheless, our democracy has not covered itself in artistic glory; but that may be because of the trajectory of art in our era. That is, art managed to deconstruct itself. For example, classic painting became impressionism became surrealism became modern art became pop art. Classical music was displaced by jazz which was driven out of the market by pop. Pop has been corporatized into a parody of repetitive crap. All art has been relentless commodified, even as art classes have been removed from primary and secondary education. (Oh, you can fork over hundreds of dollars for your kid to be in band.) Classical music itself has ossified, with the classical radio stations and orchestras playing a tiny canon of mostly Mozart, Bach, Beethoven, and Tschaikovsky.

              The movies, however commercial their origins and funding, did manage for a few decades to have an artistic Golden Age. Even the old 1930s-40s musicals are worth watching! But, now most video media is lowest common denominator sex and violence, with dialogue minimized to capture the international market. People gushing over the “nothing special” LaLaLand shows you that people do hunger for quality material – even if they are offered K-rations in nice wrappers.

              Truly, our culture is largely philistine. I don’t know whether to blame that on TPTB for pulling the plug on supporting an educated and cultured middle class, or to put some of the blame on a middle class that preferred team sports, celebrity gossip, and standup comedy over culture. In some ways, the counter-culture (whatever that was) threw the baby of classical art and literature out with the bathwater of stultifying censorship and sterile artistic conformity. Don’t even get me started on the deliberate destruction of historical knowledge!

              It may be time to start making backup copies of the really important works of literature and art. Ten years ago, in Dark Ages America, Morris Berman suggested “the monastic option” for preserving civilization in an age of decay. These days, I think he thinks we are past the point where that is workable.

              To wrap up, I don’t think Mr. Frick – a filthy rich man in an already wealthy and literate culture – has added much to our cultural heritage. But, on the other hand, if someone (rich or poor) doesn’t preserve our cultural heritage through the coming chaos, the next dark age is going to be a replay of the previous one, only plus pollution.

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